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Irish Tales of Terror

Irish Tales of Terror Introduction by Ray Bradbury bewitching stories of Irish magic and mystery An exceptional anthology of folklore and fright Features an all star cast James Joyce H P Lovecraft W B Yeats Daniel De

  • Title: Irish Tales of Terror
  • Author: Peter Haining Ray Bradbury Jane Francesca Wilde J. Sheridan Le Fanu Anonymous Oscar Wilde Charlotte Riddell George Moore
  • ISBN: 9780517654996
  • Page: 323
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Introduction by Ray Bradbury 22 bewitching stories of Irish magic and mystery An exceptional anthology of folklore and fright Features an all star cast James Joyce, H.P Lovecraft, W.B Yeats, Daniel Defoe, Ray Bradbury, Oscar Wilde, et al Covers the dark and supernatural from the 12th century to the present dayNTENTS The Legend of Fin M Coul by William Carleton TIntroduction by Ray Bradbury 22 bewitching stories of Irish magic and mystery An exceptional anthology of folklore and fright Features an all star cast James Joyce, H.P Lovecraft, W.B Yeats, Daniel Defoe, Ray Bradbury, Oscar Wilde, et al Covers the dark and supernatural from the 12th century to the present dayNTENTS The Legend of Fin M Coul by William Carleton The Fairies Revenge by Sinead de Valera The Coonian Ghost by Shane Leslie The Friendly Demon by Daniel Defoe Hell Fire by James Joyce The House In The Laurels by William Hope Hodgson The Man Wolf by Giraldus Cambrensis Witches, Fairies and Leprechauns by Lady Wilde Wicked Captain Walshawe by Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu A Wild Night In Galway by Ray Bradbury Teig O Kane and the Corpse by Anonymous The Canterville Ghost by Oscar Wilde The Banshee s Warning by Charlotte Riddell Julia Cahill s Curse by George Moore The Haunted Spinney by Elliott O Donnell The Moon Bog by H.P Lovecraft The Parricide s Tale by Charles Robert Maturin The Crucifixion of the Outcast by William Butler Yeats The Dead Smile by Francis Marion Crawford The Soul Cages by T Crofton Croker The Man From Kilsheelan by A.E Coppard Witch Wood by Lord Dunsany

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      323 Peter Haining Ray Bradbury Jane Francesca Wilde J. Sheridan Le Fanu Anonymous Oscar Wilde Charlotte Riddell George Moore
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    About "Peter Haining Ray Bradbury Jane Francesca Wilde J. Sheridan Le Fanu Anonymous Oscar Wilde Charlotte Riddell George Moore"

    1. Peter Haining Ray Bradbury Jane Francesca Wilde J. Sheridan Le Fanu Anonymous Oscar Wilde Charlotte Riddell George Moore

      Peter Alexander Haining April 2, 1940 November 19, 2007 was a British journalist, author and anthologist who lived and worked in Suffolk Born in Enfield, Middlesex, he began his career as a reporter in Essex and then moved to London where he worked on a trade magazine before joining the publishing house of New English Library.Haining achieved the position of Editorial Director before becoming a full time writer in the early Seventies He edited a large number of anthologies, predominantly of horror and fantasy short stories, wrote non fiction books on a variety of topics from the Channel Tunnel to Sweeney Todd and also used the pen names Ric Alexander and Richard Peyton on a number of crime story anthologies In the Seventies he wrote three novels, including The Hero 1973 , which was optioned for filming.In two controversial books, Haining argued that Sweeney Todd was a real historical figure who committed his crimes around 1800, was tried in December 1801, and was hanged in January 1802 However, other researchers who have tried to verify his citations find nothing in these sources to back Haining s claims A check of the website Old Bailey at for Associated Records 1674 1834 for an alleged trial in December 1801 and hanging of Sweeney Todd for January 1802 show no reference in fact the only murder trial for this period is that of a Governor Lt Col Joseph Wall who was hanged 28 January 1802 for killing a Benjamin Armstrong 10 July 1782 in Goree Africa and the discharge of a Humphrey White in January 1802 Strong reservations have also been expressed regarding the reliability of another of Haining s influential non fiction works, The Legend and Bizarre Crimes of Spring Heeled Jack He wrote several reference books on Doctor Who, including the 20th anniversary special Doctor Who A Celebration Two Decades Through Time and Space 1983 , and also wrote the definitive study of Sherlock Holmes on the screen, The Television Sherlock Holmes 1991 and several other television tie ins featuring famous literary characters, including Maigret, Poirot and James Bond Peter Haining s most recent project was a series of World War Two stories based on extensive research and personal interviews The Jail That Went To Sea 2003 , The Mystery of Rommel s Gold 2004 , Where The Eagle Landed 2004 , The Chianti Raiders 2005 and The Banzai Hunters 2007.He won the British Fantasy Awards Karl Edward Wagner Award in 2001.

    996 Comments

    1. Quite a nice little collection, even if the title is a bit misleading - IRISH TALES OF TERROR contains many a piece of fantasy that is not inherently "terrifying". But I guess IRISH TALES OF TERROR AND FANTASY doesn't roll off the tongue. And some of the pieces are retellings of classic Irish folklore, or stories of hauntings. But still, there's some good stuff here."The Legend of Fin M'Coul" by William Carleton and "The Fairies' Revenge" by Sinead de Valera are both in that "folklore retold" ve [...]



    2. This collection of Irish short stories doesn't exactly live up to its title, but was nonetheless, overall, enjoyable. Some of the stories were terribly boring and hard to follow, while others were extremely engaging and well written. Very few of the stories are what I would consider "horror", but all of the stories take place in, or are written about Ireland. Here were some of my favorites:1. The Soul Cages, by T. Crofton Croker - this a a more traditional Irish tale about a man who befriends a [...]


    3. An interesting collection of tales, either by Irish authors or set in Ireland. Many of the authors are well-known, like Oscar Wilde, H.P. Lovecraft, and Ray Bradbury, and the editor provides a short account of each author and why the specific tale was included. However, I would not say that they are all terrifying. Some certainly are, but others fall more into folklore and other genres. Wilde's The Cantervill Ghost is hilarious, and I'm not quite sure how Bradbury's fits into the collection, bei [...]


    4. In preparation for a trip to Ireland in August, I read this collection. I enjoyed Lord Dunsany's "Witch Wood" (1947), a small forest that one can never leave-- without considerable toil and trouble! Oscar Wilde's "Canterville Ghost," is where Yankee ingenuity and resourcefulness overcomes the "ghosts of the past." W. B. Yeats, "The Crucifixion of the Outcast" (1925) is about the tragedy of one who dared to live differently in a time and place of great conformity. "The Friendly Demon" by Daniel D [...]


    5. This anthology should not be confused with a quite different book with exactly the same title, but edited by Jim McGarry, which I read and didn't much care for just over a year ago. I did like this one. Haining has constructed it as an introduction to fantastic literature for readers interested in Ireland, rather than desperately grabbing anything vaguely genre and Hibernian; this does mean that some entries don't strictly fit the remit - "The Canterville Ghost", by Oscar Wilde, has no Irish con [...]


    6. This is an anthology of short stories by famous Irish (mostly) authors (e.g. Oscar Wilde, Yeats, "Traditional", James Joyce, Lady Wilde and even Ray Bradbury). The quality of the stories is varied, and most are only moderately interesting. What fascinated me is that there is a specifically Irish terror story genre. The stories are published in chronological order of original writing, which makes this a sort of history of the genre. Thus, it helped me to satisfy my craving for both engaging stori [...]


    7. The reason I love this book, is that within it is the source of Charles Dicken's Christmas Carol. Yes, he ripped off the Marley scene, almost word for word, and I've never seen it mentioned anywhere in print. Peter Haining, the editor of this book didn't even notice, or mention it. But read "The Friendly Demon," by Daniel Defoe, and tell me that Dickens didn't read it before writing his little story. If you can find a copy, read it.


    8. As with all collections, there are classic tales (including The Canterville Ghost) you've already read and some stories you were none the worst for not having read. Not particularly terrifying but an entertaining enough survey for those with an interest in folk tales with a few well-known authors' works offering variety.


    9. While there a couple stories here that weren't awful and boring, there was nothing that could be described as "terror" happening here at all unless you're REALLY scared of leprechauns. A more accurate title for this book would be "A Collection of Irish Folklore and Fairy Tales".


    10. A wonderful collection of new and old writers, specially selected for their weirdness and adherance to Irish themes. A great read for both lovers of the spernatural and the short story. Excellent notes on the writers precede each story, usually with some detail relating to the story itself.




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