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Making an Exit: From the Magnificent to the Macabre -- How We Dignify the Dead

Making an Exit From the Magnificent to the Macabre How We Dignify the Dead With the surprising humor of Mary Roach s Stiff and the globe spanning bravado of Anthony Bourdain s No Reservations this is a journey into the astonishingly diverse ways in which we send off our dea

  • Title: Making an Exit: From the Magnificent to the Macabre -- How We Dignify the Dead
  • Author: SarahMurray
  • ISBN: 9780312533021
  • Page: 340
  • Format: Hardcover
  • With the surprising humor of Mary Roach s Stiff and the globe spanning bravado of Anthony Bourdain s No Reservations, this is a journey into the astonishingly diverse ways in which we send off our deadJournalist Sarah Murray never gave much thought to what might ultimately happen to her remains until her father died Now, puzzled by the choices he made about the disposalWith the surprising humor of Mary Roach s Stiff and the globe spanning bravado of Anthony Bourdain s No Reservations, this is a journey into the astonishingly diverse ways in which we send off our deadJournalist Sarah Murray never gave much thought to what might ultimately happen to her remains until her father died Now, puzzled by the choices he made about the disposal of his organic matter, she embarks on a series of voyages to discover how death is commemorated in different cultures Death s Doors is Murray s exploration of the extraordinary creativity unleashed when we seek to dignify the dead Along the way, she encounters a royal cremation in Bali, Mexico s Dia de los Muertos, a Czech chandelier made from human bones, a weeping ceremony in Iran, and a Philippine village where the casketed dead are left hanging in caves She even goes to Ghana to commission a coffin for herself Her accounts of these journeys are fascinating, poignant, and funny But this is a very personal quest on her travels, Murray is also seeking inspiration for her own send off.

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      Published :2020-01-25T01:21:26+00:00

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      SarahMurray Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Making an Exit: From the Magnificent to the Macabre -- How We Dignify the Dead book, this is one of the most wanted SarahMurray author readers around the world.

    128 Comments

    1. I was hoping this book would be better then it actually was. Sarah Murray's dad died (which you will hear about in every chapter) causing her to confront her own death. Instead of the normal route of researching her options she decides to explore death rites and customs around the world. So she travels to a few places and experiences mummies, a royal cremation, fantasy coffins, and many more things. Sounds really interesting right? Well it would but those things only take up so many pages in a c [...]


    2. UUUUUGGGGGHHHH!! This book should be called, "I am an atheist and so is my father. And he died and I wanted to write something to honor him, but no publisher will make a book just based on that premise alone. So I told them I would write a book about how people around the world celebrate and revere the dead. But really I just want to talk about my dad. And the fact that we are both atheists."I think Random House to hire me in their marketing department.But seriously, about page 80 I decided to s [...]


    3. “Making An Exit” by Sarah Murray, published by St. Martin’s Press.Category – Death and DyingDeath and Dying is not high on most peoples reading list. It is a subject that most of us would prefer not to discuss; however, we all will face this fact of life at one time or another.Sarah Murray came to this realization on the death of her father. Her father, an atheist, wanted to be cremated and his “organic matter” (his words) scattered over a Christian cemetery.It was at this time that [...]


    4. Murray sets out to do something ambitious, braiding a personal memoir about her father's death with a survey of burial practices around the world, highlighted by her own trips to visit places with particularly unusual funerary customs.It didn't work for me because none of these three strands was developed enough for it to satisfy. The narrative darts from topic to topic without ever developing any theme fully. Her breezy post-modern ironic tone comes across as superficial and self-involved. The [...]


    5. Somewhat taken aback by her reaction to her own father's ultra-secular, low key posthumous demands, Murray investigates the other end of the funeral spectrum around the world--Sicilian mummies, Oxacan Day of the Dead, monastic ossuaries, pig raising for Philippine funerals, Chinese stores selling replica objects in cardboard to be burned as offerings to ancestors, Ghanian coffins in the shape of absolutely anything, British cemeteries in former colonies, Balinese royalty cremated in a giant papi [...]


    6. This book was a surprise. The title is certainly descriptive and much of the book is devoted to the myriad ways we deal with the dead around the world. What took me by surprise, and what I enjoyed even more, was the personal journey that the author took with her own father's death. Often when authors of nonfiction start talking about themselves, I tune out. This was a well woven, and touching, portrayal of the loss of a loved one and it really helped the stories about the other cultures. It went [...]


    7. The Washington Post's review of Making an Exit as "an Eat, Pray, Love" for the afterlife is accurate. Well written, but more travelogue than ethnography.


    8. Sarah Murray has chosen an intriguing subject for Making an Exit--how we deal with death. And she has a winning style of writing. I loved the concept–travel around the world to check on their customs and practices and decide how she herself would like to “Exit”. A travelogue of death rites.She says that death is scary stuff…“But we humans are practical beings. When we need shelter, we build a house. When we’re hungry, we hunt, farm, and cook. So when confronted with the terrifying vi [...]


    9. Sarah Murray 19s MAKING AN EXIT is a well-written, insightful read about customs surrounding death around the world.Initially, one might shy away from such a book about seemingly so macabre a topic. But Murray 19s treatment of the topic is anything but depressing. She traveled extensively to find the unique ways that cultures around the world send people to the afterworld. Readers learn about coffins shaped like cars, burying people by hanging them in a cave, and loading ashes into fireworks for [...]


    10. The book was okay but I never felt close to the author or her dead father. For all you morbidly positive readers like me I would love to hear what you think of my literary fiction 'Going Out In Style'. LOGLINE: Boris Schecter is ‘on God’s hit list.’ It’s 2016 and he’s 68 years old, intelligent, crude and knee-deep in male menopause. He wants to put something between himself and death. Okay then… he’ll play his last pool game on the Luminous Liminality, the surreal luxury cruise for [...]


    11. After her father's death, Sarah Murray begins to think seriously about death and what comes after, both spiritually and materialistically (how remains are disposed of) and what that might say about us, our families, our beliefs, and our culture. She travels the world to witness fantastical death rites in Bali, the Philippines, Hong Kong, Oaxaca, and other places. What might be a morbid subject is enlivened (um, no pun intended) by Murray's good humor and insights.


    12. Just ok. I thought this was going to be a book about grief and how people handle death from a cultural perspective. There was some of that but it was mostly about how different cultures deal with the bodies of the dead such as different burial techniques and cremation. It was interesting but I wanted more. I also was not interested in her personal story of her father's death or the last 3 pages where she outlined exactly where she would like her ashes scattered and why.


    13. This was a well written, funny, and emotionally satisfying book. The author weaves her own experiences with the stages of death, planning/holding a funeral, and mourning with places/cultures she has traveled to and from history around the world. The author also contemplates her own mortality seriously while at the same time not becoming uptight about the subject, which is admittedly a difficult one to tackle.


    14. Full of interesting death and funeral related information from around the world, but somehow didn't keep my attention the way I wanted it to. Oddly enough, didn't seem well edited - some of the personal comments about her father were repeated and it seemed the chapters were ordered after the fact so that things were mentioned again as if it were the first time. But, again, loads of interesting info.


    15. Perhaps four stars is a bit generous, but I ended up liking book more than I thought I would. Reviewers have criticized it for being a bit heavy on the reminiscences of her dad ("Fa"), and I see where they're coming from, still he did seem an interesting guy. I was struck that I felt I learned stuff from her travels (Ghana, Philippines, etc.) without getting the feeling that I'm along on a series of subsidized junkets, as happens with some nonfiction.


    16. This is the kind of non-fiction I love. It's an exploration of death rituals in other countries, told with a storyline of the burial of the author's father. I completely love the chapter on the Czech ossuaries, which fascinate me to no end, and I really liked the one about Day of the Dead (though much of that was stuff I knew already).Longer review to come. Reminded me a lot of how Weiner approaches the notion of happiness in varying cultures in his GEOGRAPHY OF BLISS.


    17. This book was more interesting than I thought it would be. It is like a long New Yorker essay on how various cultures deal with death. Most of the research was news to me. Through the course of the book, Murray is also processing her father's death and his final arrangements. The book basically worked for me. If you're not into those long New Yorker articles, don't read this book.


    18. A fascinating exploration of funeral rites in various times and places, interspersed with the author's contemplation of her father's recent death and her own final arrangements. A memorable, emotional journey with touches of humor.


    19. glad this caught my eyee takes you through different cultures in an interested, respectful wayI learned all kinds of things that I've never heard of, and started thinking about how other humans around the world manage the death "process"recommended to anyone open to nonfiction



    20. Very comfortable read. It would have benefited greatly from having pictures. It gave me tons of internet look-ups.



    21. This was a great book full of little cultural factoids about the things we do to honor the dead. I have a whole new plan for what should happen to me after I am dead.



    22. I really liked this book. She started her journey looking at funeral practices after her father died. Well written. Any author that loves Mary Roach is great!


    23. Very well written! The author explores various cultures mourning rituals while also discussing her personal loss.


    24. My nuzband got me this for our first anniversary because the first anniversary is paper and because he knows me the best.


    25. Written with a sense of humor and in the aftermath of the loss of her father, I liked the author's viewpoint re preparation for death. Interesting rituals from around the world.


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