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Craft Apprentice: From Franklin to the Machine Age in America

Craft Apprentice From Franklin to the Machine Age in America The apprentice system in colonial America began as a way for young men to learn valuable trade skills from experienced artisans and mechanics and soon flourished into a fascinating and essential socia

  • Title: Craft Apprentice: From Franklin to the Machine Age in America
  • Author: William J. Rorabaugh
  • ISBN: 9780195051896
  • Page: 425
  • Format: Paperback
  • The apprentice system in colonial America began as a way for young men to learn valuable trade skills from experienced artisans and mechanics and soon flourished into a fascinating and essential social institution Benjamin Franklin got his start in life as an apprentice, as did Mark Twain, Horace Greeley, William Dean Howells, William Lloyd Garrison, and many other famousThe apprentice system in colonial America began as a way for young men to learn valuable trade skills from experienced artisans and mechanics and soon flourished into a fascinating and essential social institution Benjamin Franklin got his start in life as an apprentice, as did Mark Twain, Horace Greeley, William Dean Howells, William Lloyd Garrison, and many other famous Americans But the Industrial Revolution brought with it radical changes in the lives of craft apprentices In this book, W J Rorabaugh has woven an intriguing collection of case histories, gleaned from numerous letters, diaries, and memoirs, into a narrative that examines the varied experiences of individual apprentices and documents the massive changes wrought by the Industrial Revolution.

    • ☆ Craft Apprentice: From Franklin to the Machine Age in America || ✓ PDF Read by ☆ William J. Rorabaugh
      425 William J. Rorabaugh
    • thumbnail Title: ☆ Craft Apprentice: From Franklin to the Machine Age in America || ✓ PDF Read by ☆ William J. Rorabaugh
      Posted by:William J. Rorabaugh
      Published :2019-04-09T17:36:17+00:00

    About "William J. Rorabaugh"

    1. William J. Rorabaugh

      Professor at the University of Washington.

    941 Comments

    1. I read this book for my continuing project to self-educate in labor history. The early part of my education, this book and a book about merchant sailors, mostly cover ground predating the existence of labor unions as we know them today (or even as we knew them in the '50s), but I understand why Professor Jamie Bronstein at New Mexico State covers this material -- it's impossible to understand labor unions (i.e. working people) of the 20th century and today if we don't understand the conditions o [...]


    2. William J. Rorabaugh's survey of craft apprenticeship's decline through the first half of the 19th century is contrasted with the concentration of capital in America's cities (and the restriction of capital for small business owners), the rise of factory work and cash wages, and a rising professional class of bookkeepers, clerks, and clock-punchers--and the bourgeois attitudes of a growing material culture. Adolescent individualism, reflected in the "personal" relationships of evangelical Christ [...]


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