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Running with the Pack

Running with the Pack Most of the serious thinking I have done over the past twenty years has been done while running Mark Rowlands has run for most of his life He has also been a professional philosopher And for him the t

  • Title: Running with the Pack
  • Author: Mark Rowlands
  • ISBN: 9781847082022
  • Page: 418
  • Format: Paperback
  • Most of the serious thinking I have done over the past twenty years has been done while running Mark Rowlands has run for most of his life He has also been a professional philosopher And for him the two running and philosophising are inextricably connected.In Running with the Pack he tells us about the most significant runs of his life from the entire day he spe Most of the serious thinking I have done over the past twenty years has been done while running Mark Rowlands has run for most of his life He has also been a professional philosopher And for him the two running and philosophising are inextricably connected.In Running with the Pack he tells us about the most significant runs of his life from the entire day he spent running as a boy in Wales, to the runs along French beaches and up Irish mountains with his beloved wolf Brenin, and through Florida swamps recently with his dog Nina Intertwined with this honest, passionate and witty memoir are the fascinating meditations that those runs triggered He ends by describing running a mid life marathon with absolutely no training Woven throughout the book are profound meditations on mortailty, midlife and the meaning of life This is a highly original and moving book that will make the philosophically inclined want to run, and those who love running become intoxicated by philosophical ideas.

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      Published :2020-02-13T03:23:32+00:00

    About "Mark Rowlands"

    1. Mark Rowlands

      Mark Rowlands was born in Newport, Wales and began his undergraduate degree at Manchester University in engineering before changing to philosophy He took his doctorate in philosophy from Oxford University and has held various academic positions in philosophy in universities in Britain, Ireland and the US.His best known work is the book The Philosopher and the Wolf about a decade of his life he spent living and travelling with a wolf As The Guardian described it in its review, it is perhaps best described as the autobiography of an idea, or rather a set of related ideas, about the relationship between human and non human animals Reviews were very positive, the Financial Times said it was a remarkable portrait of the bond that can exist between a human being and a beast, Mark Vernon writing in The Times Literary Supplement found the lessons on consciousness, animals and knowledge as engaging as the main current of the memoir, and added that it could become a philosophical cult classic , while John Gray in the Literary Review thought it a powerfully subversive critique of the unexamined assumptions that shape the way most philosophers along with most people think about animals and themselves However, Alexander Fiske Harrison for Prospect warned that if you combine misanthropy and lycophilia, the resulting hybrid, lycanthropy, is indeed interesting, but philosophically quite sterile and that, although Rowlands acknowledges at the beginning of the book that he cannot think like a wolf for such a capable philosopher and readable author not to have made the attempt is indeed an opportunity missed As a professional philosopher, Rowlands is known as one of the principal architects of the view known as vehicle externalism or the extended mind, and also for his work on the moral status of animals.

    665 Comments

    1. "It is indeed a form of worship, an attempt to find God, a means to the transcendentI have power, power that propels me cross country, puts me intimately in touch with nature, strengthens meI own the day" This is the description that Joel Henning attributes to running in his very enjoyable 1978 book Holistic Running. He describes the magnificence of running throughout the year, the beauty to be felt during a sunrise and how both mentally and physically running prepares him for the day ahead.I ha [...]


    2. This book is rich, deep and meaty. As a fan of anything that can capture the essence of running in words, I dashed into this book. It gave me as much as I could have hoped for.The author starts the novel at the starting chute of a marathon being "undercooked" having not trained for many weeks. Yet still he is going to run and acknowledges lying to himself about just running a portion to see how he feels. He knows full well he's going to keep going, and we get to hear his mental meanderings along [...]


    3. What a fascinating, engaging and easily accessible exploration of running and philosophy. A great read. Highly recommended for runners in particular.


    4. Heavy on philosophy light on running "It is indeed a form of worship, an attempt to find God, a means to the transcendentI have power, power that propels me cross country, puts me intimately in touch with nature, strengthens meI own the day" This is the description that Joel Henning attributes to running in his very enjoyable 1978 book Holistic Running. He describes the magnificence of running throughout the year, the beauty to be felt during a sunrise and how both mentally and physically runnin [...]


    5. "Joy is the experience - the recognition of intrinsic value in life. Joy is the recognition of the things that are valuable for their own sake: the things in life that are worthy of love." Third book by Mark Rowlands I've read and equally as good as the others. Can't wait to read the rest of his books.



    6. Rowlands's arguments draw judiciously on theory, empirical research and anecdote. Aside from a little repetition, he is an evocative writer. In one chapter, for example, he moves from jogging in Florida (with a cameo by Rimbaud) to snakes, Eden and Genesis, to entropy and decay, and back to what slithers: the worms that we are, and which will devour us. More Lockean associations than logical step-by-step, these passages are arresting.Rowlands's account of love, in the same chapter, is striking. [...]


    7. Welsh philosophy prof Rowlands pens a memoir detailing some of the long runs over the course of his life and the the meditations linked to them. It's easy for me to imagine this being a very unsatisfactory read for many: runners put off by the philosophy, academics equally irritated by all the running, but it struck me as near perfect, the two main threads a complementary balance. Given my fondness for Schopenhauer, which as it turned out late in the book Rowlands unsurprisingly shares, my delig [...]


    8. Mark Rowlands makes philosophy so accessible and I really enjoyed this book. Mark talks about real life, his love of animals and his ineptitude for running. Woven within this is some serious philosophy, and some important things about the meaning of play. A quote from the book that sums things up for me, "There are those who run in order to chase something else. And there are those who run simply to run." I come away thinking, 'why do I do the things I do?' I think a great writer doesn't just cr [...]


    9. Good grief. I wish I'd seen the small tag line, and had more idea this was largely philosophy with dashes of running. I struggled through 26 pages of pretentious waffling drivel before giving up. "What is the meaning of life?" - not wasting too much of it on things like this.


    10. Ένα απίστευτο βιβλίο για όσους θέλουν να εμβαθύνουν την αντίληψη τους για το τρέξιμο και να ξανασκεφτούν το νόημα της ζωής, τις ´εγγενείς´ αξίες και την ουσιαστική σημασία της χαράς.


    11. One of my all time favorite running books. Life lessons and a bit of philosophy in each chapter, "Running, I shall argue, is a way of understanding what is important or valuable in life. "



    12. I really enjoyed this book. It has a great mix of two interesting and, one would have thought, disparate topics - philosophy and running. Rowlands' central thesis is written in response to the seemingly simple question - why do we run?In answering this question he looks at the concept of value, dividing value into two types - instrumental and intrinsic value. Things that have instrumental value have no real value in and of themselves. Rather, they have value because they serve as a means to and [...]


    13. There are moments of unexpected power in this book, ones that caught me totally off guard. Rowlands has a way of weaving memoir and philosophy that creates a work greater than the sum of its parts. Even if you're not the slightest bit interested in running, dogs, or running with dogs, his meditations borne out of those subjects somehow crescendo into something resembling a full-blown strategy for living. It's worthy of a place on the shelf right next to The Philosopher and the Wolf.


    14. A rambling, repetitive, unpredictable, occasionally arresting and beautiful enquiry into the philosophy of running, particularly running with dogs, that I enjoyed despite the flaws. It's the author's right to ramble and he warns us of this in the foreword. I valued his insights when they came along, and appreciated the angle he took. Had it been tighter though I would have given it more stars.


    15. More cerebral than most books on running this makes some very interesting points (and some highly contentious ones). I enjoyed it so much I will be rereading it this summer.


    16. Not entirely convinced by Rowlands abilities as a storyteller but aside from that there is brilliantly explained and accessible philosophy to be had in this book. Would definitely read more from him.


    17. Despite that I found his book The Philosopher and The Wolf a mix of profound, intriguing and disappointingly self-righteous with misanthropic tendencies, I eagerly got this on special offer from Kindle. I took up running just over a year ago and hadn’t yet read any books on the subject. As somebody who does a lot of his thinking while running (particularly about his next writing project), I was drawn to the fusing of marathon running and philosophy – right up my street considering this new f [...]


    18. Mark Rowlands is an amateur runner and a professional philosopher. This book is a short but brilliant exploration of how running can help us to understand nothing less than the meaning of life. It jumps around a bit, and there are rather too many dogs involved for my liking, but it’s an absolutely compulsory book for anybody that considers themselves a runner and a brilliantly accessible piece of philosophy for anybody that considers themselves a human being. I’m wary of making hamfisted min [...]


    19. Mark Rowlands is a philosopher who keeps big dogs and likes to run, and this book concerns those three topics in roughly that order. I enjoyed the book for the author's seemingly honest attempt to make sense of why he runs, using his grounding in Western philosophy to do so. Unlike 'Born to Run', for example, which seemed to be trying too hard to make everything fit a preconceived theory, Mark Rowlands comes across as genuinely curious and open to discovery, letting his experience ofrunning guid [...]


    20. Part memoir, part philosophical treatise, part sports book, Running With The PackRowlands starts each chapter with a reminiscence about a particular run that has meaning for him, and uses this as a jumping-off point to explore a philosophical idea, and how that idea might apply to running and to life. He talks about work vs play and games, about freedom, and about instrumental vs intrinsic value, as well an meaning, nothingness and grappling with the idea of death.While I didn't agree with some [...]


    21. I run, and I think. Mark Rowlands does, too, and is more accomplished at both than I am. I like his voice and I usually like the examples he uses to illustrate his thoughts. I very much enjoyed the down-to-earth way he described how running can be both a pain in the ass and a joy to do, and very often those two sentiments go hand in hand. I thought his ideas in some chapters were spot on ("American Dreams" in particular) but others felt rather forced ("The Serpent of Eden"). But then, it's a boo [...]


    22. 15.03.2015 Schon wieder habe ich ein Buch wiederholt gelesen. Ausgelesen und wieder angefangen. Weil es so gut ist? Na ja, mir hat dieser Text in weiten Strecken gut gefallen und trotzdem gab es viel Unrundes in diesem Buch. Im Prinzip ist es ein Text der vom Älterwerden berichtet. Biologische Fakten und philosophische Annahmen werden einmal sehr gelungen und dann wieder furchtbar "patschert" erzählt. Der Autor weist gerne auf seine englische Geburtsnationalität hin aber das Buch ist ein typi [...]


    23. Rowlands gets four stars from me not because I agree with everything he says, but because he makes you think. Few books on running make you exercise your brain like Rowlands does as you turn the pages. I loved the passages on running and how he would continue to return to the sport in various stages of his life. His fascination with wolves creeps me out, but hey, I don't even like dogs. He has an interesting slant on doing things for their intrinsic value and the philosophy of play/game reminds [...]


    24. To be honest, Rowland gave me things to consider. I felt affirmed that I don't have to think deeply while running. When I run, the thoughts roll in and out. There is a rhythma cadencea beat. And I feel, more times than not, that I am simply running just to run. But overall, Rowland's themes were depressing. I understand what he means when he talks about us "disappearing." Also, I am experiencing what he talked about in terms of my physically body not getting betterI am growing old. But his main [...]


    25. A deeply enjoyable book. In tribute to Rowlands, I write that I found pleasure in the book but I hope that, ultimately, the book will bring me Joy. Read the book and understand what I mean. Each chapter follows a common format, beginning with a tale of a time and of a run and ending with a philosophical insight that came about because of the run or through reflection on the run. As I worked my way through the chapters, I found myself hurrying through the former in expectation of the latter and w [...]


    26. A philosophical take on running, it has some poignant moments as well as some ramblings that were way over my head. This is not a book about being a better runner, completing a grueling race, the history of running, or the human evolutionary predisposition to running. This is a book that tries to explain running in the modern context and answer the simple question of "Why run?."The author presents a few different reasons but the one that resonated with me is simply that it is a form of play. Pla [...]


    27. In this highly original book philosopher and amateur runner Mark Rowlands explores the reasons why he runs.Interspersed with his ruminations on significant runs is a dialectical investigation into how the theories of various philosophers can be applied to running. Rowlands cogently argues that running returns us to something we have lost, as we are caught up in seeking the ‘goals’ of work and materialism. We intuitively understand the importance of play for its own sake during childhood and [...]


    28. Great book for a philosophy, running and dogs/wolves enthusiast like myself.Lots of good insights into why living and running with animals can be good for health and mind; the intrinsic value of joy and play rather than living life instrumentally seeking fleeting pleasure.His descriptions of finding joy in the heartbeat of a long run, and when thoughts are flowing through the mind when running and writing rang true for me.It is a personal journey though, and perhaps Rowlands writes generally whe [...]


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