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How the World Was: A California Childhood

How the World Was A California Childhood In French cartoonist Emmanuel Guibert befriended an American veteran named Alan Cope and began creating his new friend s graphic biography Alan s War was the surprising and moving result the sto

  • Title: How the World Was: A California Childhood
  • Author: Emmanuel Guibert Kathryn Pulver
  • ISBN: 9781596436640
  • Page: 231
  • Format: Paperback
  • In 1994, French cartoonist Emmanuel Guibert befriended an American veteran named Alan Cope and began creating his new friend s graphic biography Alan s War was the surprising and moving result the story of Cope s experiences as an American GI in France during World War II.How the World Was is Emmanuel Guibert s moving return to documenting the life of his friend Cope diIn 1994, French cartoonist Emmanuel Guibert befriended an American veteran named Alan Cope and began creating his new friend s graphic biography Alan s War was the surprising and moving result the story of Cope s experiences as an American GI in France during World War II.How the World Was is Emmanuel Guibert s moving return to documenting the life of his friend Cope died several years ago, as Guibert was just beginning work on this book, but Guibert has kept working to commit his friend s story to paper Cope grew up in California during the great depression, and this remarkable graphic novel details the little moments that make a young man s lifewhile capturing the scope of America during the great depression A lyrical, touching portrait, How the World Was is a gift for a dear friend in the last moments of his life and also a meditation on the birth of modern America.

    World World distinguishes the entire planet or population from any particular country or region world affairs pertain not just to one place but to the whole world, and world history is a field of history that examines events from a global rather than a national or a regional perspective. How the World Map Looks Wildly Different Than All of us have seen a world map at some point in our lives before, but it is very difficult to imagine how certain countries and parts of the world compare to each other in size that are far apart. How many countries are there in the world There are countries in the world today This total comprises countries that are member states of the United Nations and countries that are non member observer states How was the world created answers Answer The world was created by a long process beginning with the collapse of a huge molecular cloud under the influence of gravity Most of the mass collected to form the sun, with a disk of How the world sees the U.S and Trump in America s global image today is complicated On balance, people around the world continue to give the United States favorable ratings and say it respects the individual liberties of its people. Ways to Help Change the World wikiHow The world today is definitely not a paradise Hunger, abuse, poverty, pollution, and violence are all too common Granted, the world never has been, and probably never will be perfect, but that means there s lots of room for improvement You can help to create a better world for the future And it s not as hard as you think. The World JoJo s Bizarre Encyclopedia Round The World Star Alliance A world class product offers outstanding value allows you to travel on Star Alliance member airlines The Round the World Fare is your ticket to the world. How the world s best performing school systems Education reform is top of the agenda of almost every country in the world Yet despite massive increases in spending last year, the world s governments spent trillion on education and ambitious attempts at reform, the performance of many school systems has barely improved in decades. World Population Clock . Billion People The term World Population refers to the human population the total number of humans currently living of the world Billion According to the United Nations, world population reached Billion on October , .

    • Free Read [Music Book] ☆ How the World Was: A California Childhood - by Emmanuel Guibert Kathryn Pulver À
      231 Emmanuel Guibert Kathryn Pulver
    • thumbnail Title: Free Read [Music Book] ☆ How the World Was: A California Childhood - by Emmanuel Guibert Kathryn Pulver À
      Posted by:Emmanuel Guibert Kathryn Pulver
      Published :2019-04-05T15:14:21+00:00

    About "Emmanuel Guibert Kathryn Pulver"

    1. Emmanuel Guibert Kathryn Pulver

      Emmanuel Guibert has written a great many graphic novels for readers young and old, among them the Sardine in Outer Space series and The Professor s Daughter with Joann Sfar.In 1994, a chance encounter with an American World War II veteran named Alan Cope marked the beginning of a deep friendship and the birth of a great biographical epic.Another of Guibert s recent works is The Photographer Showered with awards, translated around the world and soon to come from First Second books, it relates a Doctors Without Borders mission in 1980 s Afghanistan through the eyes of a great reporter, the late Didier Lef vre.Guibert lives in Paris with his wife and daughter.

    754 Comments

    1. Guibert's art is magnificent. In particular, he has a real knack for drawing people, and he gets all the expressions, positions and proportions absolutely right. As for the story, mmmhhh this book is following the childhood of Alan Cope, a friend of Guibert, and old guy who agreed to have his memories recorded by Guibert. Therefore, the book reads exactly like what it is: an old guy telling you about his distant past. Unfortunately, he does not come across as an interesting guy at all. I'd say t [...]


    2. If you’ve read more than a sturdy handful of my reviews here, you’ll likely have gathered that I love to talk about myself. Or perhaps not so much about myself (in terms of ego) but rather about my life, about the things I’ve experienced, the way things have been. A couple months back, I was trying to describe what I do at Good Ok Bad and I happened upon the description: memoir-based, low-brow lit-crit. The reason I spend so much time telling stories about who I am and have been is that I [...]


    3. Emmanuel Guibert's HOW THE WORLD WAS is the companion story to our previously published graphic novel, ALAN'S WAR, which takes you through World War II from the perspective of one single man. HOW THE WORLD WAS tackles Alan's youth, growing up in California. It's fascinating -- rather than being a historical story about Big Events or even Big Ideas, it's all the strange and weird and interesting points of an ordinary person's life, and what it was like to grow up in America's past.


    4. Pages read: 50I know I was almost a third of the way through this graphic novel, so DNFing seems a bit silly, but holy shit am I bored. It's important to record what life was like on a daily basis, sure, but even the parts that should have been interesting are told in this way that makes me feel like a kid sitting in the Peanuts classroom. I don't find anything the slightest bit interesting, except for the full color illustrations that opened the book. Otherwise, bored bored bored bored bored.



    5. I really, really liked this book. I imagine it's not for everyone, but I like memoirs and since my daughter has moved to California, I enjoyed reading of that state in an earlier, simpler time. The author/illustrator has taken stories of his friend's childhood, as related to him before the man's death, and turned them into a lovely graphic memoir/biography. This childhood was during the Great Depression when California was much less crowded and glitzy. The separate little incidents don't particu [...]


    6. Book blurb: In 1994, French cartoonist Emmanuel Guibert befriended an American veteran named Alan Cope and began creating his new friend's graphic biography. Alan's War was the surprising and moving result: the story of Cope's experiences as an American GI in France during World War II.Telling someone's biography in Comics form is an interesting choice, and this form captures a sense of emotion that would be harder to do in prose. The art is fantastic, and wonderfully atmospheric, but I was not [...]


    7. This is a beautiful graphic novel that tells of a life in California before WWII, before smog and crowds. For a second-generation native Californian like myself, this is like hearing a series of nostalgic family anecdotes and stories. There's no real sense of plot- the book is like a series of snapshots that come together to make a contemplative record of a life, of a family, of things gained and lost, of changes that occur over time. The ending is heartbreaking and hopeful. The digital galley I [...]


    8. Entirely Engrossing! This is the prequel to "Alan's War", which I haven't read yet. Written in a first person perspective, it is the story of Alan Cole's life growing up, and his family's, during the Great Depression. A touching story from a man with deep insight into the human condition. Rivetting. Guibert's art is fantastic! Though I haven't read "Alan's War", I have read "The Photographer" and the style is similar to it. Guibert uses his own pencil sketches plus actual photographs along with [...]


    9. Un magnifique dessin qui sert une très belle narration. Un plongeon très sensible dans l'enfance d'Alan et un voyage dans la Californie avant la seconde guerre mondiale. Une rare justesse dans la manière dont le graphisme répond au texte.


    10. Alan Ingram Cope ci racconta il suo passato remoto: quando era bambino e l'america avea un ritmo e un aspetto diverso. La povertà della grande depressione, i piccoli giochi inventati, con mezzi di fortuna, le amicizie fortuite e le grandi riunioni con i parenti. L'infanzia di Alan ha un sapore nostalgico, impreziosito dai soliti splendidi disegni di Guibert, come foto ricalcate a contorni spessi. Dopo la guerra di Alan un giusto complemento alla trilogia.


    11. This graphic novel is more a collection of memories rather than a traditional story, with lovely artwork and languid pacing. It was so languid, in fact, that I was jolted by the story's major event when it arrived. Overall, I appreciated how the graphic novel form is used here—it refashions something larger out of what is basically reminiscing.


    12. nonfiction (childhood stories from a ww2 veteran/grandpa). More stories from Alan of Alan's War. Maybe not as riveting as the war stuff, but I enjoyed these. I miss having a grandpa.


    13. ARC provided by NetGalleyIn 1994 a French cartoonist named Emmanuel Gilbert met an American war veteran named Alan Cope. The two became fast friends and Emmanuel decided that Alan’s story needed to be shared with the world. Gilbert shared Cope’s experiences and story as an American GI in France in WWII in a graphic novel titled “Alan’s War.” But Gilbert was not done telling Alan’s story. He began working on his friend’s life growing up in California during the Great Depression. Sad [...]


    14. In addition to writing and drawing graphic novels for children, Guibert has done a few nonfiction titles for teens. In Alan’s War he wrote about the experiences of soldier Alan Cope during World War II. In this book he returns to Cope’s story, now telling of his childhood and adolescence in pre-war Southern California. I picked this up as a BAYA review book and I continue to be mystified about why this was in a stack of books for teen librarians. The exposition is spare and the topic is not [...]


    15. In addition to writing and drawing graphic novels for children, Guibert has done a few nonfiction titles for teens. In Alan’s War he wrote about the experiences of soldier Alan Cope during World War II. In this book he returns to Cope’s story, this time telling of his childhood and adolescence in pre-war Southern California. It is a lovely, lyrical book. Cope’s memories of his childhood experiences, what Los Angeles and surrounding areas were like, and his family history are charming, almo [...]


    16. I haven't read Alan's War, which covers the wartime experiences of Alan Cope, but after reading this graphic novel, I certainly will. The author/illustrator pays tribute to his friend who was born in 1925. Although it is a family story about the different sides of Cope's family, it is much larger than that since Cope lived in different parts of California when the state was far more rustic than it is today. I've often maintained that everyone has their own unique stories to tell, and this book p [...]


    17. I thought this was fascinating. Words and illustrations drop you into the life of a young boy growing up in California during the 1930's. It has some of the feeling of "a Death in the Family" in the sense that an adult looks back and remembers early events that have shaped and influenced his life for decades and that formed his understanding of the world. There is very little vanity and no posturing, just honest recollections that tell a quietly compelling story and give us a sustained look into [...]


    18. I would recommend this book to everyone I know. I think that it is quite a wonderful journey of a young boy's recollections of growing up in California early in the 1900sFor anyone who has spent any time in California and is familiar with the smog of L.A. and the traffic jams on the 101 and the 405 and the more industrialized texture of California since the 1950s, this book will be a refreshing and eye opening look at how pristine and beautiful this state once was.This story takes the reader way [...]


    19. I was attracted to this book because of its wonderful drawings of Southern California in the 20s and 30s. Although lots of development took place after World War II, enough of the places depicted here remained into my childhood in the 50s and 60s so that I was intrigued enough to buy the book. I was disappointed by the book's content, which was more specific to the main chatacter's childhood and family than I had expected. I was hoping for a more general look at California childhood experiences [...]


    20. Wow. I didn't expect this book to be as good as it was. I expected it to be great. I bought it after reading only the first 4 pages. But even after being caught by the first few pictures, it blew me away. As the subtitle explains, it's a memoir of a California childhood. Basically it tells the story of the people who where already in California during the Depression, kinda a good counterpoint to Grapes of Wrath that I just read. There were some weird parts that I probably wouldn't have included [...]


    21. This is a great book to sharpen up one's rusty French, while enjoying the artwork. It's a graphic novel, in the style of Guibert's "Alan's War", but in French.Most of the book feels like an exercise in translating everyday French terms and reminiscing about 1920s and 1930s California. But I found that by the last third of the book, I was thinking well enough again in French to understand the meaning of the words and sentences, even when I couldn't find the terms in my French-English dictionary. [...]


    22. I cannot recommend Emmanuel Guibert's two books (this and Alan's War) about the life of his friend Alan Cope strongly enough. These are magical works that tell, through words and evocative drawings, sequences of what might seem to some a fairly ordinary twentieth century lifebut they are so much more. They embody that thing that happens with an intimate friend when your moment of communion seems to be a glimpse of the purpose of life. A chance meeting between a French illustrator and an American [...]


    23. Many of you know Emmanuel Guibert's graphic novel Alan's War. Guibert is a French cartoonist who tells the true story of Alan Cope, an American GI in France in WWII. How the World Was: A California Childhood depicts Alan's earlier childhood experiences, growing up during the Great Depression in California. The graphic novel is unlike others that I've read, and I really enjoy Guibert's style. The chapters read like vignettes of Cope's childhood; some of the scenes are graphic, and many are quite [...]


    24. I enjoyed this biography, written and drawn by Emmanuel Guibert, about his friend, Alan Cope. I had not read the first book, "Alan's War", but I think you could start with this one as I did. It is rather melancholy, but aren't many books about life during the Grea Depression? It is also sweet, and a tender tribute to one man's California childhood. Older teens may enjoy this, but I think that mostly this is for an adult audience, purely because many youth wouldn't yet understand why someone woul [...]


    25. If I could travel through time, one of the places I would want to visit is California in the 1920's, so obviously the topic of this book interested me. I enjoyed the stories about growing up in California during a time when there were no freeways, no suburbs. I'm old enough to remember when there were still many farms, dairies, and orchards side-by-side with new housing tracts, and it didn't take long to get to "wild" places that were worth exploring. But the stories in the book were all sort of [...]


    26. Elegiac, haunting, elegantly drawn. A sort of prose poem to the world that was, both of a particular era, and of the real loneliness and strangeness of childhood. And the concept behind it -- Guibert drawing from his friendship and basically oral history of an American WWII veteran. I wish there was more, and definitely that there were more oral histories turned into graphic novels. There's a respectful and melancholy distance between the subject and the author, which isn't there in memoirs, per [...]


    27. Some of the best slice-of-life biography since American Splendor. Yes, I know that was technically autobiography, but the feel is similar. This is real life in telling details. Very little happens in terms of earth-shattering events, but the wealth of detail bring's Alan Cope's--an American WWII veteran who became good friends with Guibert--story to marvelous life. California in the years leading up to the Depression was very different from the California of today. This graphic novel is a fine e [...]


    28. This is the story of a Southern California boyhood. It is notable not only for its vision of a landscape which has vanished in Southern California but also in its depiction of people's lives in the inter-war era of the '20s and '30s. Guibert's drawings accompany a narrative by Alan Cope which tells of his own history and that of both of his parents and some of their ancestors, such as a grandfather on his mother's side who had fought in the Civil War and in the Indian Wars.


    29. It's actually been awhile since I read this, but I remember liking the artwork in it. The idea of doing someone's biography in comic form is an intriguing one, definitely different - which is something I have a high respect for as a reader. But there is an extremely disjointed narrative and in comic form that can make things way harder to follow than if it were just words. As a result, not something I enjoyed a whole lot.*Copy provided by NetGalley for honest review.


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