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July Crisis: The World's Descent into War, Summer 1914

July Crisis The World s Descent into War Summer This is a magisterial new account of Europe s tragic descent into a largely inadvertent war in the summer of Thomas Otte reveals why a century old system of Great Power politics collapsed so disa

  • Title: July Crisis: The World's Descent into War, Summer 1914
  • Author: T.G. Otte
  • ISBN: 9781107064904
  • Page: 212
  • Format: Hardcover
  • This is a magisterial new account of Europe s tragic descent into a largely inadvertent war in the summer of 1914 Thomas Otte reveals why a century old system of Great Power politics collapsed so disastrously in the weeks from the shot heard around the world on June 28th to Germany s declaration of war on Russia on August 1st He shows definitively that the key to underThis is a magisterial new account of Europe s tragic descent into a largely inadvertent war in the summer of 1914 Thomas Otte reveals why a century old system of Great Power politics collapsed so disastrously in the weeks from the shot heard around the world on June 28th to Germany s declaration of war on Russia on August 1st He shows definitively that the key to understanding how and why Europe descended into world war is to be found in the near collective failure of statecraft by the rulers of Europe and not in abstract concepts such as the balance of power or the alliance system In this unprecedented panorama of Europe on the brink, from the ministerial palaces of Berlin and Vienna to Belgrade, London, Paris and St Petersburg, Thomas Otte reveals the hawks and doves whose decision making led to a war that would define a century and which still reverberates today.

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      Published :2020-04-23T05:07:25+00:00

    About "T.G. Otte"

    1. T.G. Otte

      A professor of diplomatic history at the University of East Anglia, Thomas Otte specializes in the diplomatic and international history of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

    306 Comments

    1. It was just over three years ago that I decided to get interested in the First World War. I remember the time period because my wife was pregnant with our first child and I was freaking out that my life would be totally upended and I’d never read or see or learn anything new at all, except what came on Sesame Street. I say “decided” because I chose World War I as the “last” topic I’d read about as a free, childless man. I began systematically enough, with general histories on the who [...]


    2. “The spring and summer of 1914 were marked in Europe by an exceptional tranquility.”Winston Churchill The July Crisis: The World’s descent into War, Summer 1914 by Thomas Otte is the history of the events leading to the First World War. Otte is a professor of diplomatic and international history of the 19th and 20th century at the University of East Anglia. He has written books on diplomatic history and China, as well as publishing numerous essays in academic journals. Earlier this year, I [...]


    3. When arriving a bit late for a dinner party, there is that awkward and embarrassed feeling the diner quickly gets as he steps into a group heavy with discussion. If he has any savoir faire, he would recognize that he has just entered an already raging conversation and would be clearly foolish to speak too authoritatively on the present topic. It is almost the same sensation with regard to Thomas Otte’s new 555 page hardback, “July Crisis: The World's Descent into War, Summer 1914.” Otte, P [...]



    4. A straightforward, readable history of the July Crisis, mostly concerned with questions of “how” and “why” as well as the importance of timing. Otte remains focused on the decisionmakers of the crisis and clearly describes the chain of motives, plots, and blunders leading up to the assassination of Ferdinand and the subsequent diplomatic fallout. While no one wanted a general war, from reading this book you get the impression that no one really wanted to stop a war either.Otte does not c [...]


    5. My ARC courtesy of Cambridge University Press and NetGalley - much thanks!Fascinating if you like diplomatic history or are seriously interested in the origins of World War I (I am both). A tale of assassination-as-farce followed by diplomacy-as-farce.For a further review: susannagoklikes/post/92 .


    6. A gripping account of the march to WWI, yet not quite perfectA very, very good overview of the July Crisis. Not a tremendous amount of new information about any one individual, but enough new here, and a good dovetailing of all the intersecting story lines, to make this a worthy five-star book.Key new points for me were above all the "second blank check" from Jagow to Vienna. After that, playing up Tschirschky's having cone native, looking at Lichnowsky's efforts to sincerely prevent war, while [...]


    7. This is a great book. It involves a reading of both the documents but also of what is equally important---the character and personality of the authors of those documents. It is at times almost a minute by minute examination in the capitals of all the powers of the crisis caused by the assassination of the Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife. The book is dense. Among the ambassadors, I had trouble remembering who represented whom and where. That said, the author obviously never forgets. He also [...]


    8. This book is a diplomatic history of the long month from June 28, 1914 the start of the First World War in the first wee" by Sean Mcmeekin. I owuld have passed this book up but for Lawrence Freedman's review essay on recent WW! books in the Nov-Dec 2014 issue of Foreign Affairs. Freedman suggested that Otte's book would be worth the effort and I heartily agree.So what is so good about the nth history of the most studied month ever? What is there new to say? Otte finds quite a lot to say and has [...]


    9. Once again.A VERY LOUD HUZZAH AND THANKS to the Leominster Public Library for be able to locate this book.We recently went to Montreald at one of the museums we were atdes seeing the original picture by Gaughin's " The Swineherd" and the original self portrait of Van Gogh along with one of Napoleon's hat and the painted picture of Napoleon and Waterloowe found two books at their library. I thought it would be cheaper to by it at Indigo or Barnes & Nobles.but egads neither had them When we go [...]


    10. On the centenary of the outbreak of World War I, there are many books covering the period from assorted points of view. This book focuses on the month between the assassination of the Arch Duke and his wife to the declaration of war.No one can doubt that WWI put into motion circumstances that would have far-reaching impact not just on those involved but the entire world in the future. Despite the chest thumping of the victors and the vilification of the losers, the causes for war were not black [...]


    11. Most of the other reviews remind us of the centenary of the events in this book. Not surprisingly, if you are new to the era or have focused mostly on the military history of the war you may find this history a bit dry. The cast of characters are largely forgotten by modern readers being mostly foreign ministers and bureaucrats with their well-known comtemporaries like Kaiser Wilhelm, Moltke, Czar Nicolas, and others occasionally walking on the stage to remind the reader of the overarching story [...]


    12. There are so many exciting new books out about WWI. Each address a different angle of the war or the month preceding it. Otte's is an engrossing account of the diplomatic efforts in July 1914, to avert, as Otte's subtitle states, the world's descent into world war. Otte is Professor of Diplomatic History, and his knowledge and expertise adds to the excitement and clarity of this intriguing month of statecraft or the lack thereof, from the ministerial offices of Berlin to St. Petersburg, Vienna t [...]


    13. Thomas Otte's JULY CRISIS is a truly fascinating totally in depth history of the political and diplomatic start of WWI. Otte makes this potentially dry history into a page turning heart-stopping all consuming read - you know what is going to happen - you have probably read and know bits and pieces - but with a finger in the list of characters, it became compelling reading - could these supposedly world leaders be soept, underhanded, stubborn. He talks about tunnel vision for empires, monarchs, p [...]


    14. We are right at the precipice of the Centennial of the Great War--the "war to end all wars"--the First World War. Cambridge University Press has provided several new works further delineating this most horrid and blood-drenched of eras. Among them is Professor T. G. OTTE'S wonderfully readable "July Crisis," a fresh look at a century-old subject. June 28 marks the 100th anniversary of the assassination of Serbian Archduke Franz Ferdinand, the catalytic event which spiraled Britain and Europe (an [...]


    15. Hollywood serves as history instructor for many Americans, and some wars are grander than others to these historians and filmmakers. The box office seems to indicate that World War I isn’t all that exciting to produce, perhaps even a bit confusing, and really only serves as the first part of a two-part series in which the second installment is much more provocatively suited to the screen.But for those who recognize that before the cinematic war with the mustached man there was The Great War, T [...]


    16. July Crisis is a review of the diplomacy of the Great Powers between the assassination of Franz Ferdinand and the German declaration of war with Britain. Otte claims that World War I was not caused by alliances but instead by miscommunications and failures of diplomacy. He alleges that Austria-Hungary suffered from "tunnel vision" in declaring war on Serbia because the war party in Austria-Hungary did not consider the international consequences of their actions. In this narrative, Germany enable [...]


    17. Excellent and well balanced study or origins of WW IPuts the blame where it belongs: on bad management of German foreign relations and narrow thinking in Vienna. Had Berlin been reasonable, or Vienna not behaved recklessly, there would have been no war. Does this not mean they were guilty?


    18. Very detailed and, I would suggest, not for the casual reader. Those with some prior knowledge of the events should find it fascinating.



    19. Great insight on the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand the heir of the throne of Austria-Hungary and the events that led up to the first world war in Europe.


    20. A thorough and intellectually rigorous re-examination of the events and diplomatic scurryings leading up to the outbreak of the First World War. A major achievement.



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