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The Green Bicycle

The Green Bicycle In the vein of Year of the Dog and The Higher Power of Lucky this Middle Eastern coming of age story is told with warmth spirit and a mischievous sense of humor Spunky eleven year old Wadjda lives

  • Title: The Green Bicycle
  • Author: Haifaa al Mansour
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 182
  • Format: None
  • In the vein of Year of the Dog and The Higher Power of Lucky, this Middle Eastern coming of age story is told with warmth, spirit, and a mischievous sense of humor.Spunky eleven year old Wadjda lives in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia with her parents She desperately wants a bicycle so that she can race her friend Abdullah, even though it is considered improper for girls to ride bikIn the vein of Year of the Dog and The Higher Power of Lucky, this Middle Eastern coming of age story is told with warmth, spirit, and a mischievous sense of humor.Spunky eleven year old Wadjda lives in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia with her parents She desperately wants a bicycle so that she can race her friend Abdullah, even though it is considered improper for girls to ride bikes Wadjda earns money for her dream bike by selling homemade bracelets and mixtapes of banned music to her classmates But after she s caught, she s forced to turn over a new leaf sort of , or risk expulsion from school Still, Wadjda keeps scheming, and with the bicycle so closely in her sights, she will stop at nothing to get what she wants.Set against the shifting social attitudes of the Middle East, The Green Bicycle explores gender roles, conformity, and the importance of family, all with wit and irresistible heart.

    • Þ The Green Bicycle || ☆ PDF Read by ☆ Haifaa al Mansour
      182 Haifaa al Mansour
    • thumbnail Title: Þ The Green Bicycle || ☆ PDF Read by ☆ Haifaa al Mansour
      Posted by:Haifaa al Mansour
      Published :2020-01-19T14:00:19+00:00

    About "Haifaa al Mansour"

    1. Haifaa al Mansour

      Haifaa al Mansour Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Green Bicycle book, this is one of the most wanted Haifaa al Mansour author readers around the world.

    472 Comments

    1. 3.75 stars. This book is based on the author's award winning film, Wadjda. It is not, however, the novelisation of a movie. It's very much a novel in its own right, as evidenced by the fact that the movie came out in 2012 and the book came out in 2015. Anyway. This is the story of an 11 year old girl living in Saudi Arabia. She's a precocious and rebellious kid who wears jeans and ratty Converse under her school uniform, who sells mix tapes and snacks at massive mark ups to help her mother pay t [...]


    2. I loved this book! This is what they're talking about when they say #WeNeedDiverseBooks. We NEED a book about a sassy pants eleven-year-old Saudi Arabian girl who sells forbidden contraband and uses her smarts to save up money to buy a forbidden bicycle.I must admit, I was nervous when I saw this book was written by a filmmaker and based on her film "Wadjda." Novelizations of movies typically aren't very good. But this is NOT a novelization. It's a beautifully written novel that stands on its ow [...]


    3. Wow! The Green Bicycle was published in September 2015, after the very successful 2012 feature film Wadjda garnered world-wide respect for Haifaa Al Mansour, the first female director to come from Saudi Arabia. Sometimes I make the mistake of setting my expectations for a long-awaited book too high, but this book did not disappoint me. In fact, Al Mansour captures every facet of a middle-class, working woman’s world in Saudi (reading this brought me right back to my eight years in Kuwait). The [...]


    4. Set in modern day Saudi Arabia, this will give a lot of insight into life in a place many U.S. children are unfamiliar withGrades 4-6


    5. Wadjda lives in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, where it seems like there are a million rules governing how girls and women are supposed to behave. Wadjda's mother has to cover herself from head to toe, everything but her eyes, when they are out in public, and Wadjda, too, has to wear a long black abayah that covers her clothes and hair. Wadjda hates being confined by rules; she secretly loves Western music and wears Converse sneakers under her school uniform. Her greatest wish, though, is to race her bes [...]


    6. Wadjda lives in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia with her mother, who has a job as a teacher a grueling distance away from home. Her father rarely comes home, and rumor has it that he is looking to take a second wife because Wadjda's mother can't provide him with a son. Wadjda has quite a business at school, selling candy and trinkets to her school mates. When she sees a shiny green GIRL'S bicycle in a shop, she is bound and determined to save her money in order to get that bicycle, so she can win races aga [...]


    7. Delightful coming of age story about an 11 year old girl in Saudi Arabia who has lots of spunk and doesn't quite fit in to the strict society.I thoroughly enjoyed every moment of this novel, in part because it is so unique to read a YA novel set in Saudi Arabia, but also because usually books from this region focus on oppression. Although that forms a natural part of this story, it doesn't overtake it or distract from the main storyline which is about family, belief and hope.Thanks to the publis [...]


    8. I was challenged to read a book by an author from Saudi Arabia. And it really was a hard challenge! Mostly because it was really hard to find a book by a Saudi Arabian author. I would really prefer to read fiction, but 1) The Green Bicycle was the one and only Saudi Arabian book in my library; 2) Even if I wanted to ask for a book from another library, there is nothing to ask for. All I found were several stories about the fate of girls in that country written by female authors who happily escap [...]




    9. I love the protagonist in this book, a girl named Wadjda, who is growing up in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. We see life and the people around her through her eyes. She is smart and savvy and conflicted. All she wants to do is own a green bicycle that she has seen for sale in the town. I learned a lot about Muslim culture and customs and expectations in this book. From a Western perspective, it is hard to believe that people would be so against a girl having her own bicycle but there it is. Wadjda's mot [...]


    10. This is a tender story of a young girl who is struggling to be herself in a world that has very definite opinions about who she should be and how she should behave. Wajda is a feisty, spunky entrepreneurial protagonist who sets a goal for herself and, despite challenges, works hard to achieve it. I'm not sure how to feel about the story. The writing is very good, don't misunderstand! But reading this book about modern day Saudia Arabia and Muslim practices made me feel conflicted. I wasn't sure [...]


    11. This is basically the story of a girl defying cultural expectations and pursing her dreams. What makes it so intriguing is those cultural expectations are from Saudi Arabia. Wadjda lives amid the extremely strict and confining rules of Saudi cultural and religious life. The story flaunts those rules and in some ways left me wondering how critical the author wanted to be of her homeland. Also intriguing is that the book first appeared as a movie, Wadjda, before being turned into a book. Rarely se [...]


    12. That was a really nicely done coming-of-age story. I particularly liked the audio read by Ariana Delawari--it was sweet without being unbearableybe a bit slow with the precise diction, but I imagine it would be great for children unfamiliar with words and concepts from Saudi Arabia. I loved the largely female cast and how complicated many of the characters were--no small feat for a middle grade novel. This will definitely be a recommended read for my library families.


    13. Having seen the movie Wadjda, I very much enjoyed reading this book to gain a few more details. I found it very interesting to read about the lifestyles in Saudi Arabia, and the culture. I have a lot of respect for the women that live there and learning about their religious practices was also intriguing.


    14. Wadjda was a great heroine! She was spunky, and determined and very much a realistic 11-year-old. I highly recommend reading this book. It was also a nonjudgmental portrayal of a Saudi Arabian girls life.


    15. Great for young readers to follow this spunky girl as she tries living like a good Muslim girl in Saudi Arabia. Even with all the restrictions in her life, she finds ways to still be herself and have fun. She has a dream and she doesn't give up.


    16. THE GREEN BICYCLE by Haifaa Al Mansour is a realistic fiction, set in modern time in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. It is a compelling story about eleven years old Wadjda from a poor family but flawless and struggled very hard to make her dream come true which is to own a green bicycle and to compete with a young boy Abdullah. Religion and cultural strictly forbid all females from riding bicycle, sing, and wearing pants in Saudi Arabia which is a huge obstacle for Wadjda to reach her goal. Wadjda lived i [...]


    17. Al Mansour, Haifaa The Green Bicycle, 346 pgs. Penguin, 2015. $16.99. Language: PG ( 2 swears, 0“f”); Mature Content: PG (men talk rudely to girls and women, some maturation discussion); Violence: G. 11-year-old Wadjda wants more than anything to have a bicycle, like her friend Abdullah, but it is against the strict religious standards in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia for a girl to even ride a bike, let alone own one. But Wadjda is a schemer and a planner. She sells candy and bracelets and mixtapes t [...]


    18. Grades 5-9. I haven't seen the film. This book was written by a Saudi journalist, which gave the story more authenticity. The book shares what it's like to be a girl growing up in Saudi Arabia-- full body coverage, school=religion class, segregation of the sexes, fear. And yet here is a spunky 11 year old girl who defies culture in subtle ways. She finds a way to save money and is determined to buy a bike, which girls are not supposed to ride. What really sank in for me was the family roles of m [...]


    19. A former student of mine really enjoyed this book and suggested I read it. This is a lovely story of a Muslim girl who is a total tom boy with a strong spirit. Wadjda is an 11 year old living in the traditional and religiously strict world of Riyadh where women and girls have few to no rights and little freedom. However, Wadjda sells things on the side to earn extra cash, makes mix tapes of Western music, and dreams of buying a green bicycle. Along this quest for the bicycle, we witness the soli [...]


    20. More like 2.5 stars. I really thought Wadjda was cute and a really fun and spunky character. I also enjoyed the ending of the story and thought it was touching. But there were elements of the story I just didn't enjoy that made it a little bit of a slower read for me, and it's not that long of a book. I know some of the stuff I didn't care for is reality for some women/girls though. But it made me not want to read at times. I think that is part of trying to read outside of your comfort zone thou [...]


    21. Spunky eleven-year-old Wadjda lives in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia with her parents. She desperately wants a bicycle so that she can race her friend Abdullah, even though it is considered improper for girls to ride bikes. Wadjda earns money for her dream bike by selling homemade bracelets and mixtapes of banned music to her classmates. But after she's caught, she’s forced to turn over a new leaf (sort of), or risk expulsion from school. Still, Wadjda keeps scheming, and with the bicycle so closely in [...]


    22. I listened to the book and it took me a while to get through, but I think I didn't spend enough time listening at the beginning. It picked up nearer to the end. Beautiful middle grade novel about a Saudi girl's determination to buy her own bicycle, even though bicycles are not for girls, since they would ruin their "virtue". I appreciated Wedjda's realistic character and her determination, even though she got frustrated or discouraged at times.


    23. I enjoyed this glimpse into the life of a modern Saudi girl, and the story, although it seemed a bit predictable, had some small twists--enough to keep it interesting. The book was written based on a movie ("Wadjda") and it definitely reads like a scene-for-scene adaptation, good or bad.




    24. Une jolie introduction à la culture saoudienne par le biais cette histoire. Même si je connaissais certains aspects de cette culture, j'étais quand malgré tout triste de lire toutes les interdictions, en particuliers celles faites envers les femmes.Aussi, l'auteur livre de personnages réalistes : ils ont des qualités comme ils ont des défauts. J'ai beaucoup aimé ce livre. Par contre, je n'ai pas trouvé le glossaire très utile. En effet, la plus part du temps, l'auteur expliquait les mo [...]


    25. This book was so good to read. It was honest and accurate, but also highly hopeful. I strongly recommend this book.


    26. While I thought it was a slow start, I really enjoyed getting to know Wadjda (11 yr old main character) and learning SO much about her culture! I was surprised by some of the culture rules and behaviors, but also interested to see so many similarities with American teens as well. She is definitely a strong-willed, independent young lady. She so badly wants to save money to win a shiny green bike at the local store. Girls don't ride bikes though, according to her motherDetermination, perseverance [...]


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