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Walking the Kiso Road: A Modern-Day Exploration of Old Japan

Walking the Kiso Road A Modern Day Exploration of Old Japan Step back into old Japan in this fascinating travelogue of the famous Kiso Road an ancient route used by samurai and warlords which remains much the same today as it did hundreds of years ago Take a

  • Title: Walking the Kiso Road: A Modern-Day Exploration of Old Japan
  • Author: William Scott Wilson
  • ISBN: 9781611801255
  • Page: 196
  • Format: Paperback
  • Step back into old Japan in this fascinating travelogue of the famous Kiso Road, an ancient route used by samurai and warlords, which remains much the same today as it did hundreds of years ago.Take a trip to old Japan with William Scott Wilson as he travels the ancient Kiso Road, a legendary route that remains much the same today as it was hundreds of years ago The KisojStep back into old Japan in this fascinating travelogue of the famous Kiso Road, an ancient route used by samurai and warlords, which remains much the same today as it did hundreds of years ago.Take a trip to old Japan with William Scott Wilson as he travels the ancient Kiso Road, a legendary route that remains much the same today as it was hundreds of years ago The Kisoji, which runs through the Kiso Valley in the Japanese Alps, has been in use since at least 701 C.E In the seventeenth century, it was the route that the daimyo warlords used for their biennial trips along with their samurai and porters to the new capital of Edo now Tokyo The natural beauty of the route is renowned and famously inspired the landscapes of Hiroshige, as well as the work of many other artists and writers Wilson, esteemed translator of samurai philosophy, has walked the road several times and is a delightful and expert guide to this popular tourist destination he shares its rich history and lore, literary and artistic significance, cuisine and architecture, as well as his own experiences.

    • ☆ Walking the Kiso Road: A Modern-Day Exploration of Old Japan || Þ PDF Read by ✓ William Scott Wilson
      196 William Scott Wilson
    • thumbnail Title: ☆ Walking the Kiso Road: A Modern-Day Exploration of Old Japan || Þ PDF Read by ✓ William Scott Wilson
      Posted by:William Scott Wilson
      Published :2019-04-27T06:09:42+00:00

    About "William Scott Wilson"

    1. William Scott Wilson

      William Scott Wilson Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Walking the Kiso Road: A Modern-Day Exploration of Old Japan book, this is one of the most wanted William Scott Wilson author readers around the world.

    104 Comments

    1. There's not all that much travel narrative in audio format, and I'm a bit picky, so thought this one seemed promising -- it was. If you're looking for comedic asides, a la Bill Bryson, this ain't that. Closer to Theroux, although Wilson knows the area, rather than observing as a detached stranger; indeed, some of the folks he runs across he considers friends, even if he has not had any contact with the person recently. In a nutshell, the story contains observation of the scenes along the route, [...]


    2. I have enjoyed many of W.S.W.'s translations, and his biography of Miyamoto Musashi, but this book dragged for me. Travel writing, which this book is an example of, is a specialty that few people do well. Those that master the genre can do amazing things. This is not that book, unfortunately. It is interesting in places, but more so in the history of the road itself. Someone took an interesting walk and wrote a competent, if flat, book.


    3. What an enjoyable and insightful journey that the author provides as he walks along the Kisoji again, documenting his experiences. He also includes context with details of the specific Buddhist Temples and Shinto Shrines he walks by, his interactions with the local people, and some history regarding the road's establishment and some towns' successful development and others' decline. The author has spent much time in Japan, leading back to the 1970s (or was it even in the late 1960s?) and offers [...]


    4. The Kiso road was the road that the Japanese warlords used on their trips to and from the capital Edo (Tokyo) in the 1600s although the route thru the Japanese mountains and passes has been in use since at least 701 C.E. This ancient traffic was supported by inns and post towns all the length, some of which are still in service today. Wilson, a Japanese translator, has walked the Kiso Road several times. He mixes his travelogue with Confucius sayings, Japanese haikus and historical tidbits.Why I [...]


    5. This is just one of those books that makes you want to get out and walk, see the same places, walk the same paths.Not as powerful as Booth, or as entertaining as McLachlan, or as funny as Chavez (in case you wanted a push towards other "walking in Japan" books), but still a nice read.



    6. This had the potential to be a great book. The subject, a road in Japan that has been used as a device of political control but eventually became an early modern mode of tourism under the Tokugawa Shogunate, Wilson is at his best when he is doing his history thing, contextualizing the road he is traveling on. Wilson, one of the more famous translators of Japanese today, also does something fascinating by bringing in his knowledge of Japanese in by quoting delicious snatches of Japanese poetry an [...]


    7. While I relished the details, I must say I found the tone of the book a little flat. For such a solitary, reflective journey, I was expecting a more calm, harmonious tone from someone with a lot of experiences in Japanese culture.I was disappointed.For any travel writing book, the journey must have a purpose, or offers a specific perspective that started at the beginning of the journey, thoroughly discovered, tested during the journey and (hopefully) concluded in the end. While I understood that [...]


    8. I won my copy of this book through a giveaway. My sister studied Japanese in college, so I thought this book might be interesting and a good gift for her when I finished reading it. I think she'll enjoy it. This is a travel journal type of book, describing a walk along a very old road in Japan, sort of the equivalent of the Hadrian's Wall walk I've read books about in the past. I may never go to Japan, but I still enjoyed the imagery of this account. I think I would get more out of it if I was [...]


    9. This is how trail guides should be written. The author, a fluent guide to Japanese language and culture, writes this engaging mix of travelogue and hiking guide that reveals both the historical and modern nature of this ancient route. Interspersed with commentary and poetry by writers who have walked this road going back hundreds of years, it is both a physical and literary journey.While the author ends each cross-disciplinary chapter with mileage and time of that section of the route, this book [...]


    10. A charming meditation on one of Japan's historic walks, taken slowly by one of my favorite translators of Japanese works into English. It's far from his first time down the Kiso Road, but that layers the book in a way that benefits the reader -- stories from previous trips, knowledge of historical figures and their walks, stays, battles, poems, road barricades, all are included. I enjoyed the practice of trying to read the haiku and other texts in the original before reading them in English, and [...]


    11. This book caught my spirit and took me away. I read it with heart and soul open and came away replenished.I walked the old Kiso road with the writer. As I do when I travel, he delves into the history of the villages he passes through and the temples he visits. We meet the hosts who welcome him into their ryokans for a night. We melt into the hot baths they provide for him, baths he sorely needs after walking between three and six miles a day, sometimes over mountainous winding paths. The meals t [...]


    12. So, I entered a giveaway for this book because my little sister is really interested in Japanese history and I thought it would be a fun book for her. Yet my bookworm tendencies where hard to overcome when the book came in the mail. I was soon drawn into the book and couldn't put it down. I went as so far to read it during my biology class! The book really blends the modern day story of the author walking the road with the historical background of the Kiso road and the different stories people h [...]


    13. Having had high expectations - and intending to walk the Kiso Road - I felt more than a little disappointed with this book. The author has had an impressive career translating historical texts but this text, although a gentle and occasionally interesting read, just does not give one a sense of deep scholarship informing his walk along the Kiso Road. One never really gets a sense of the walk and the vignettes never really help us to know the people Wilson meets along the road. At one point I foun [...]


    14. This book needs two things: a map and an index.I read it because I'd come across mentions of the Kiso Road in several books about Japan. The author more than met my expectations, covering history and the experience of walking the road. I liked that his ability to speak Japanese allowed him to converse with the Japanese people he met and that his previous experiences on the road were also included. And the poetry (translated by the author, I assume) added another perspective.


    15. As I hope one day to make this journey, this guide provided me with a wonderful window into the possibilities of experiences to be had. Having done some hiking in Japan, I read with much interest his attention to detail at the signs along the way. For a country often bemoaned for all the concrete it lays down, these pages describe the "other" Japan. This one is slower, more thoughtful, and observant of all around it. Well worth the time


    16. Wilson leads a tour through time and space in this engrossing memoir of his hike along the 60 mile stretch that weaves through central Japan. Currently home to the modern Chuo railway line, the ancient Kiso road is punctuated by 11 post towns that provide overnight lodgings and the opportunity to ‘step backward in time’ over a period of three weeks in 2013. But where are the maps?


    17. This was a lovely book about walking the Kiso Road from Tokyo to Kyoto.d ancient road built in 1700's ns dot the way and it was full of haikus and descriptions of food and hot bathsI am going to Japanese mtns in fall and I can't wait !!


    18. This was a lovely and lovingly written travel guide written by a student of samurai philosophy. In addition to describing the trails and towns along the Old Kiso Road, he goes into great depth about the history and art of the region.


    19. Interesting in the history, the references to classical Japanese literature, haikus and the culture revealed. The glossary was welcomed but could have been expanded on. BUT WHAT was this author and publisher thinking - no map?!?


    20. Wilson is my favorite translator of martial arts texts. This is not that, but it is a pleasant stroll through history and landscape with a fellow whose literary company I enjoy.


    21. This is the type of book that makes you want to take up walking and travel. I wish I had the time for a journey like this.


    22. A highly evocative travelogue--you feel you're actually there with the author walking and hiking the paths, visiting the temples, drinking sake with locals. Calming and rich with history and culture.


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