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Selected Poems

Selected Poems Winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry Winner of the William Carlos Williams Award The Selected Poems James Tate s Pulitzer Prize winning collection and his first British publication gathe

  • Title: Selected Poems
  • Author: James Tate
  • ISBN: 9780819511928
  • Page: 324
  • Format: Paperback
  • Winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry 1992 Winner of the William Carlos Williams Award 1992 The Selected Poems James Tate s Pulitzer Prize winning collection and his first British publication, gathers work from nine previous books, from the Lost Pilot which was a Yale Younger Poets selection in 1967, through his 1986 collection Reckoner He is a most agile poet in a prWinner of the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry 1992 Winner of the William Carlos Williams Award 1992 The Selected Poems James Tate s Pulitzer Prize winning collection and his first British publication, gathers work from nine previous books, from the Lost Pilot which was a Yale Younger Poets selection in 1967, through his 1986 collection Reckoner He is a most agile poet in a precarious world Life is alarming and absurd, but properly considered that absurdity reveals, often with laughter, the something else by which we live The poems are about our world, our wrecked, vexed love for it Tate has been described as a surrealist If that is what he is, his surrealism issues in a vision of a world delivered back to itself by his unillusioned subversion and candor.

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      Published :2019-04-26T08:59:26+00:00

    About "James Tate"

    1. James Tate

      James Vincent Tate was born in Kansas City, Missouri He taught creative writing at the University of California, Berkeley and Columbia University, and at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, where he worked since 1971 He was a member of the poetry faculty at the MFA Program for Poets Writers, along with Dara Wier and Peter Gizzi.Dudley Fitts selected Tate s first book of poems, The Lost Pilot 1967 for the Yale Series of Younger Poets while Tate was still a student at the University of Iowa Writers Workshop Fitts praised Tate s writing for its natural grace Despite the early praise he received Tate alienated some of his fans in the seventies with a series of poetry collections that grew and strange.He published two books of prose, Dreams of a Robot Dancing Bee 2001 and The Route as Briefed 1999 His awards include a National Institute of Arts and Letters Award, the Wallace Stevens Award, a Pulitzer Prize in poetry, a National Book Award, and fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts He was also a Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets.Tate s writing style is difficult to describe, but has been identified with the postmodernist and neo surrealist movements He has been known to play with phrases culled from news items, history, anecdotes, or common speech later cutting, pasting, and assembling such divergent material into tightly woven compositions that reveal bizarre and surreal insights into the absurdity of human nature.

    543 Comments

    1. The late James Tate (who taught right down the Pike from me, and who knew?) grew to be a wild and wooly sort of poet. You know. Knightly. The kind of poet who hangs with Sir Real. These "Selected" poems, culled from chronological books, show his pilgrim's progress. It's always interesting to compare a respected poet's early work with his or her later work. Here we have some early Tate:"Epithalamion for Tyler"I thought I knew something about loneliness butyou go to the stockyardsbuy a pig's ear a [...]


    2. Any collection with a wonderful poem called "Fuck the Astronauts" is the one you're gonna keep returning to. Tate is a nice heir to Wallace Stevens and some of the more absurd, hilarious poets of the 20th century. He's got a fine, grim sense of humor and he isn't afraid to let lightning strike a man's clitoris or have pinball machines rape pianos.


    3. Racing through this one in a couple days probably didn't do myself or the author a favour, but it's a library book, I had to. Tate's a favourite poet of some of my favourite poets -- it was fun to hear bits of their voices in his voice and, as an inexperienced reader of poetry, to speculate more generally about the lineage of poetic influence that has led to what I think of as the modern sound of poetry in the Internet Age. In my make-believe lineage, James Tate's an important giant. Whatever th [...]


    4. I came across James Tate's poetry in an anthology of Prose Poems, and immediately fell in love with his style. That has spurred me on to get a representative collection of his writing, and by and large I have not been disappointed. This is a wonderful book, with some of the most imaginative use of images and language that I have come across. However, I believe that Tate's prose poems are superior to the rest of his writings, and would really like to read a collection of those. Overall, however, [...]



    5. It takes a while to learn how to read and understand Tate, and you need to give some of the difficult pieces a few reads - but viewing each as a free association dialogue at first helps. In any event, whether you seek to understand or just experience, this collection is like no other you will ever encounter.


    6. I'm hit or miss with Tate. Read this the last few nights, and I'm still not sure with him. I seem to resonate more with the early stuff, especially the first two books (I LOVE The Lost Pilot).I do like a lot of his prose poems, but so much of the lineated stuff could just as well be in prose at least to my tin ear.


    7. I'm not quite in the James Tate arena . . . but close. I love the wordsmith, the abstract, the insight, the originality, even the quirkiness (can I say that?), but I'm sorry, he's not Chalres Simic. I guess it all begins with Simic and goes from there, even if Tate has won the Pulitzer.


    8. I'm reading it again and it's still so good. He should get more credit for changing the voice of poetry. I think Dean Young should thank him and all the fancy boys-with-attitude poets, I guess girls too, publishing now funny, sarcastic and heart-breaking all at once.









    9. The little bit that I have read about this book so far has been really good. gives me some good tips on how to write poems! great book so far.






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