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Men Without Work: America's Invisible Crisis

Men Without Work America s Invisible Crisis By one reading things look pretty good for Americans today the country is richer than ever before and the unemployment rate is down by half since the Great Recession lower today in fact than for mo

  • Title: Men Without Work: America's Invisible Crisis
  • Author: Nicholas Eberstadt
  • ISBN: 9781599474694
  • Page: 397
  • Format: Paperback
  • By one reading, things look pretty good for Americans today the country is richer than ever before and the unemployment rate is down by half since the Great Recession lower today, in fact, than for most of the postwar era But a closer look shows that something is going seriously wrong This is the collapse of work most especially among America s men Nicholas Eberstadt,By one reading, things look pretty good for Americans today the country is richer than ever before and the unemployment rate is down by half since the Great Recession lower today, in fact, than for most of the postwar era But a closer look shows that something is going seriously wrong This is the collapse of work most especially among America s men Nicholas Eberstadt, a political economist who holds the Henry Wendt Chair in Political Economy at the American Enterprise Institute, shows that while unemployment has gone down, America s work rate is also lower today than a generation ago and that the work rate for US men has been spiraling downward for half a century Astonishingly, the work rate for American males aged twenty five to fifty four or men of prime working age was actually slightly lower in 2015 than it had been in 1940 before the War, and at the tail end of the Great Depression.Today, nearly one in six prime working age men has no paid work at all and nearly one in eight is out of the labor force entirely, neither working nor even looking for work This new normal of men without work, argues Eberstadt, is America s invisible crisis So who are these men How did they get there What are they doing with their time And what are the implications of this exit from work for American society Nicholas Eberstadt lays out the issue and Jared Bernstein from the left and Henry Olsen from the right offer their responses to this national crisis For information, please visit menwithoutwork.

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      Published :2020-01-04T09:39:59+00:00

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    476 Comments

    1. Men Without Work:America's Invisible Crisis (2016) by Nicholas Eberstadt looks at the dramatic decline in the US male labour force participation rate over the past 50 years. Nearly one in six men had no paid work at all and one in eight was completely out of the labour force. The US generally has lots of people who work lots of hours, but in terms of the male participation rate the US is dramatically lower than other countries.The book goes through how the rate has steadily decline and Eberstadt [...]


    2. In "Men Without Work", Nicholas Eberstadt roundly documents the ever increasing number of men who have elected to disengage from the American workforce. In this regard he has made "America's Invisible Crisis" less invisible. This is an important starting point and it being his primary aim in this thin volume, he is successful. Beyond documenting the problem, Eberstadt makes a number of plausible hypotheses as to why labor force participation has plummeted among American men but with less clear d [...]


    3. Interesting book that lays out the enormity of the issue of men of prime working age in the United States who are not part of the workforce, and are largely disconnected from society at large. I think the author grossly over states the issue of the social safety net, as it's much smaller and parsimonious here in the US than in many other advanced Western democracies, and yet the Labor Force Participation Rates here are lower than every other nation but Italy. I think the other contributors corre [...]


    4. "The growing incapability of grown men to function as breadwinners cannot help but undermine the American family. It casts those who nature designed to be strong into the role of dependents — on their wives or girlfriends, on their aging parents, or on government welfare." — page 5, Men Without Work: America’s Invisible Crisis.Could there be a more establishment Republican sentence than that? Partisanship aside, there’s a serious problem within the American labor force — one that has g [...]


    5. It is kind of an anti-welfare screed. I had a hard time following some of the statistics, and the tables needed a magnifying glass to identify who the different lines represented because the color coding differences were largely ineffective given the size.The overall conclusions -- that American welfare programs and incarceration practices and rates have created an army of men without work though -- are effectively argued.Whether poverty would be less and labor participation and employment more [...]


    6. A bit heavy-handed in its tone and approach, Men Without Work nonetheless conveys the exigency of the seven million middle age males who opt out of the labor force. Work nourishes and provides structure to a life in addition to a livelihood, and the author depicts the importance of work well throughout the book.


    7. Not a bad book, but not what I was expecting. I was expecting a focus on conclusions and maybe solutions, but this book is mostly data about the problem, lots and lots of data. A quick read, but shallow in many respects.


    8. The points in this little book are so alarming, that I re-read the book to better understand them. (I have also raised my review to 5-Stars.) On my first read, I did not fully comprehend an astonishing point the author makes (p.180): "For every prime-age man who is out of a job and looking for one there are three others who are neither working or looking for work."What--this can't be! At first, I thought I had misunderstood the author--but I had not. Even after adjusting for men taking training, [...]


    9. This is a quick and very interesting read--documenting the decline in men's prime-age labor force participation. I was quite mixed on the book--I thought it was too dismissive of demand-side arguments, and arguing from a biased point of view (especially around the efficacy of social programs) in parts--until I got to the second part.This section has something I've never seen before, and which I thought was incredibly redeeming--the author invites two people with opposing viewpoints to write a ch [...]


    10. Written as a wake-up call to address the issue of a growing number of American men between 25 and 54 who are not working or looking for work. The number in the US is greater than in other industrialized countries and has been growing steadily since WWII. He brings out toward the end that there is a relationship in the US between the number of men outside the work force and the exceptionally large numbers of men who have been imprisoned since the 1980s, given the difficulties of felons in obtaini [...]


    11. SHORT ; I liked that the author gives proof of his data. No conclusions in this book. I think this was written for an economist or his peeps in colleges, think tanks etc. and not for general consumption. If it was intended for a general audience then this editor needs to check themselves. What a dry read. Men w/o work doesn't have my reason for not working (actually I have a job, in construction so this generally doesn't apply to me, hence why I am still working.) PC BS! I am tired of working wi [...]


    12. Men Without Work documents the problem of the discouraged male worker not measured in unemployment numbers. While the problem has been long lamented by economists, it remains largely misunderstood or invisible as the title suggests. While highlighting the problem, it is not forgiving of the male discouraged worker himself (who statistically spends more time watching tv and claims a disproportionate amount of income from claiming disability or from cohabiting women). While long on jargon and shor [...]


    13. It started out good but then got a bit dense. I did like that he eventually got around to what to do about it though.


    14. Short but compelling book highlighting (yet) another looming yet little followed problem for the US economy. While light on solutions, it's a good starting point for future discussion I'd say.


    15. Lots of numbers but little analysis or ideas for solving a very real problem of a large segment of the population who has simply dropped out of the work force. I am convinced this is a problem but I don't think this book is much of an analysis of why we have the problem or what to do with it. On the plus side, it's short.


    16. Mention the drop in the unemployment rate to any of President Obama's many detractors and they will immediately point to the large number of people who have left the workforce. This book slices and dices a variety of data to examine the departure of prime working age (25-54) men from the workforce, a trend that started in the mid-1960s and has increased steadily over the past 50 years. We now have an estimated nine million prime-aged men who have left the workforce and are not looking for work. [...]


    17. A very academic monograph; heavy with statistics and chartsking it somewhat difficult to read on my Kindle. The title is an exact description of the content. The author includes two critiques of his analysis. No solutions are proposed, other than as a society we need to recognize this "invisible crisis" and begin to develop plans to overcome what has the potential to become a significant percentage of our prime-age male population.



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