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Report on Probability A

Report on Probability A An ominous sequence unfolds when it is revealed that strangely intriguing Mrs Mary is being watched from her garden by a trio of strange characters G S and C who are in turn being watched by another

  • Title: Report on Probability A
  • Author: Brian W. Aldiss
  • ISBN: 9780755100651
  • Page: 278
  • Format: Paperback
  • An ominous sequence unfolds when it is revealed that strangely intriguing Mrs Mary is being watched from her garden by a trio of strange characters G, S and C who are in turn being watched by another observer, who is being watched by a solitary figure on a hill in a third dimension, who is being watched by a group of men in New York, who are being watched by a clairvoyAn ominous sequence unfolds when it is revealed that strangely intriguing Mrs Mary is being watched from her garden by a trio of strange characters G, S and C who are in turn being watched by another observer, who is being watched by a solitary figure on a hill in a third dimension, who is being watched by a group of men in New York, who are being watched by a clairvoyant s prying mind In this bizarre and brilliant novel nothing is certain and everything is relative.Cover Illustration Derek Edwards

    • Best Download [Brian W. Aldiss] ☆ Report on Probability A || [Science Fiction Book] PDF ☆
      278 Brian W. Aldiss
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      Posted by:Brian W. Aldiss
      Published :2019-06-02T07:41:55+00:00

    About "Brian W. Aldiss"

    1. Brian W. Aldiss

      Pseudonyms Jael Cracken, Peter Pica, John Runciman, C.C Shackleton, Arch Mendicant, Doc Peristyle.Brian Wilson Aldiss was one of the most important voices in science fiction writing today He wrote his first novel while working as a bookseller in Oxford Shortly afterwards he wrote his first work of science fiction and soon gained international recognition Adored for his innovative literary techniques, evocative plots and irresistible characters, he became a Grand Master of Science Fiction in 1999 Brian Aldiss died on August 19, 2017, just after celebrating his 92th birthday with his family and closest friends.Brian W Aldiss Group on Good Reads

    729 Comments

    1. M opened the review form and paused indecisively. Report On Probability A, by Brian Aldiss. He noted the date he had read it - some time in the mid 70s - and tentatively gave it one star. Two would evidently be excessive. "It's kinda weird," he wrote, then stopped, searching for further ideas. What else could he say about the book? He saved the review. Maybe something would come to him later.Moments later, M's text appeared on N's screen. She considered it thoughtfully for a second and added a q [...]


    2. I remember reading this novel when I was about fifteen. I liked it, although I didn’t understand it one bit. I’d previously enjoyed Aldiss’ short stories and had read ‘Earthworks’. Thinking about it now, why, if Earthworks at the time had seemed a more satisfactory novel, can I remember very little about it, while ‘Report…’ hangs in my mind like a stubborn dream?These days, it makes a lot more sense to me, but the persistent dream element is still present.In some ways it is remin [...]


    3. This book's reputation goes before it, and it's a shame it doesn't wave a red flag too. Famous for being intentionally boring, it certainly succeeds in its aims.An ordinary house is being closely watched over the course of a day by men who live in its surrounding outbuildings. The universe in which this thrill-less adventure occurs is known as Probability A by the people in a parallel universe(?) who are reading the eponymous report (along with us), never wondering about what kind of maniac woul [...]


    4. imam potrebu da svim knjigama koje sam ikad oznacila jednom zvjezdicom povecam ocjenu samo da ne budu u istom rangu s ovom, sto je zivot, ocaj, mentalni horror vacui, socijalni konstrukt, razocaranje, @pedrocalderondelabarca,


    5. Inspired (according to the author's account) by Werner Heisenberg's theory that the act of observation changes the phenomena being observed, 'Report on Principal A' would make a good basis for a study of the anti-novel.Three people spy on a house, from which they have been expelled. A separate group of people keep watch over their every move, apparently from the vantage point of another dimension (although this is never confirmed). The report that they write forms the bulk of the novel's text (h [...]


    6. This book is 156 pages long, a paperback printed in English with black ink and written by a famous English science fiction author. The prose is laden with infinitesimal detail about the most inconsequential aspects of its characters and main setting. It is written in the manner of an academic report, which it is: the main "story" of the book comprises a lengthy and detailed report on a possible alternate reality. It is a book inspired by the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle, in which observation [...]


    7. This short experimental novel combines science/speculative fiction with the avant-garde of writers like Robbe-Grillet. It is infamously told in a drily descriptive manner at the almost total expense of character and plot (something it jokes about), making it too boring for many readers. For those who can get into it enough to pay attention to detail, however, reading it will be much like putting together the pieces of a fascinating puzzle. But instead of that puzzle adding up to a convention sit [...]


    8. Honestly, I don't know what to tell you. Certainly I do not regret reading this. I think I am a more well-read individual for having read it. Unlike others on this review thread, I did not find the reading experience particularly boring. The experiment is interesting, and funny. If you dig it, you'll get through the book, probably with a few smiles along the way. If you skip it, no loss. As I said, it is an experiment more than a novel, and because Aldiss is a brilliant writer, even a throwaway [...]


    9. Five stars because it was remarkable. But it absolutely won't be to everyone's taste. It's experimental, it's an anti-novel, it's deeply, deeply, deliberately boring. I remember reading it and entering a sort of fugue state; to me, the reading experience was unique and, if not exactly enjoyable, well worth the time. It's only a wee little thing, so you won't waste more than a couple of hours if you do decide to give it a go.


    10. So strange, but so coolRecommended to my from my futurama calendar (like so many great sci-fi books), this book is about a person watching someone from their windowd someone watching the person who is watchingd an alien race watching the person watching the person watching the personweird, crazy, awesome.


    11. You may have had to write a descriptive paragraph in school. You have to describe a scene. The important thing is"," there is no action to further a story in such a paragraph.Brian Aldiss has expanded this concept to an entire novel. Scientists are observing various realities in order to determine which is the Real. But nothing actually happens. A truly maddening read.


    12. A recursive paranoid masterpiece?An inquiry into the implications of an observer-defined quantum reality?A derailing of time across the multiverse?Nope. Just a long, slow, repetitive read -- probably the idea of what a factual report must look like to somebody who has never read one.You're not missing anything by skipping this one.


    13. Not a lot of action, but a lot of character introspection. This is a good book for s omeone who wants to learn about writing different perspectives.


    14. Interestingly boring anti-novel. (As i found out later). Adding to my puzzlement was the fact that Sphere Publishing had printed pages 97-112 twice, which really threw me. Is this part of the novel? Was Aldiss making more of a statement? Did everyone look up at that point in the novel and go who is watching my reaction? What did the people with hands over their eyes, in a car, signify? How many questions can i ask of one short book? Do I throw in a joke here as a sop to people who think my revie [...]


    15. I don’t know what led me to pick this one up, but I think I needed to read it in a lot different context and with a closer eye than I did. I recall very little from this one and found it to be somewhat incomprehensible. This might have also been the point? I don’t know, but I’ll need to probably try this again sometime.


    16. This book is extremely strange, being an antinovel deliberately written to examine the concept of nouveau roman. Alain Robbe-Grillet was a proponent of this style, and a well-known Internet encyclopaedia says he "regarded many earlier novelists as old-fashioned in their focus on plot, action, narrative, ideas, and character. Instead, he put forward a theory of the novel as focused on objects: the ideal nouveau roman would be an individual version and vision of things, subordinating plot and char [...]


    17. I'm really not sure what to make of this book. It is intentionally action less, I gather as Aldiss' attempt at an anti-novel. There is, I think, something being said about the nature of reality and subjective experience, but Aldiss was cleverer than I am, and his point eludes me. That said, it has something of the postmodern about it, with the metaphoric allusions and literal inclusion of references to WH Hunt's painting "The Hireling Shepherd" and Iain Banks, one of my favourite SF and literary [...]



    18. Experimental novel in which nothing much happens. A bit like watching a 60s art film when you're not pissed or stoned.



    19. I enjoyed what the book set out to do but it never got there thanks to writing as artless and lifeless as the W. H. Hunt painting it references repeatedly. Worse yet, it was the wrong kind of weak writing. I'm familiar with government reports and they have their own brand of terrible writing distinct from this book. I can't articulate the difference exactly but they feel different and that's what really matters. I once edited a poorly translated report on forestry in the Russian Federation—nev [...]


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