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Books that matter: the history of the decline and fall of the roman empire

Books that matter the history of the decline and fall of the roman empire In Books That Matter The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire Professor Damrosch invites you on a riveting lecture examination of this great work from multiple perspectives as a va

  • Title: Books that matter: the history of the decline and fall of the roman empire
  • Author: Leo Damrosch
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 270
  • Format: Audiobook
  • In Books That Matter The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Professor Damrosch invites you on a riveting, 24 lecture examination of this great work from multiple perspectives as a vast historical chronicle, as a compelling masterpiece of literature, as a sharp commentary on cultural s, and as a cautionary tale to Enlightenment Europe An engaging, cIn Books That Matter The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Professor Damrosch invites you on a riveting, 24 lecture examination of this great work from multiple perspectives as a vast historical chronicle, as a compelling masterpiece of literature, as a sharp commentary on cultural s, and as a cautionary tale to Enlightenment Europe An engaging, chapter by chapter guide to the Decline and Fall, Professor Damrosch s course helps you navigate the book s themes, structure, philosophies, background, and lasting influence Whether you ve read the book before and are looking for new ways to think about it, or whether you ve always wanted to read it but never knew where to start, Professor Damrosch s lectures are a fascinating, rewarding, and authoritative guide to the enduring legacy of a once mighty empire and the great book that became its eulogy and epitaph.For all its renown as a work of style, elegance, wit, and insight, The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire can be intimidating for the armchair historian Published between 1776 and 1781, the six volumes contain 1.5 million words, an estimated 8,000 footnotes, a cast of 10,000 historical figures, and they span a timeline of than 1,000 years.Yet, even today, centuries after its original publication, Gibbon s historical chronicle demands to be read and understood There are several important reasons for this, according to Dr Leo Damrosch, Professor of Literature Emeritus at Harvard University First, while later historians have brought fresh perspectives to the Roman Empire s collapse, Gibbon s book remains profoundly truthful in the events it recounts, bringing what Professor Damrosch calls a unifying, insight inspiring perspective to the past Second, a great work of history is just as much about storytelling as it is about events Gibbon is a masterful storyteller, and his Decline and Fall still has the ability to hook modern day readers with its style and manner just like a great novel.And third, Gibbon was and remains a landmark historian who revolutionized the way writers think about and interpret the past Despite being a product of his time in certain views, his techniques and insights would lay the foundation for generations of future historians.

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    About "Leo Damrosch"

    1. Leo Damrosch

      Leo Damrosch is an American author and professor In 2001, he was named the Ernest Bernbaum Professor of Literature at Harvard University 1 He received a B.A from Yale University, an M.A from Cambridge University, where he was a Marshall Scholar, and a Ph.D from Princeton University His areas of academic specialty include Romanticism, the Enlightenment, and Puritanism 1 Damrosch s The Sorrows of the Quaker Jesus is one of the most important recent explorations of the early history of the Society of Friends His Jean Jacques Rousseau Restless Genius 2005 was a National Book Award finalist for nonfiction and winner of the 2006 L L Winship PEN New England Award for best work of nonfiction Among his other books are Symbol and Truth in Blake s Myth 1980 , God s Plot and Man s Stories Studies in the Fictional Imagination from Milton to Fielding 1985 , Fictions of Reality in the Age of Hume and Johnson 1987 , and Tocqueville s Discovery of America 2010.

    130 Comments

    1. These twenty-four lectures provide interesting commentary about Edward Gibbon's The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire. These lectures can be used as helpful interpretive guidance for someone reading The Decline, but for me the lectures are simply an easy way to become familiar with a classic work of literature without actually reading all six volumes. Gibbon devoted much of his life to this work (1772–89), and he is generally credited with furthering historical methodology an [...]


    2. About half of the time of these lectures are taken up with summarizing Gibbons writing and those parts are pretty good. The other half has the lecturer babbling on on topics only tangentially related to Gibbons writing.


    3. These lectures aim to provide context for Gibbon's epic history of the final centuries and aftermath of the Roman Empire. I plan to read the original someday and when I do this book will have given me a better foundation for that experience. However, for me, "Books that Matter" is most effective in revealing the heroic nature of Gibbon's endeavor. He spent two decades of his life creating and honing a historical narrative comprising 1.5 million words that became and instant classic when publishe [...]


    4. First, I think an audio book is the perfect medium for this set of lectures. Dr. Damrosch delivers an exquisite performance that kept me engaged the entire time. Not only did I learn about the context of the work, time well spent before undertaking to read Gibbon's volumes I think, but also learned more about the actual history of antiquity. I felt not only was this a set of lectures about the book and its author, but also a broad brush approach to general Western history.I, personally, feel tha [...]


    5. this is part of The great courses lectures which are usually good. This series doesn't stand out but it is competently handled and interesting enough and the subject area is a fave of mine.


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