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The Notebooks of Joseph Joubert

The Notebooks of Joseph Joubert The elusive French luminary Joseph Joubert is a great explorer of the mind s open spaces Edited and translated by Paul Auster this selection from Joubert s notebooks introduces a master of the enigma

  • Title: The Notebooks of Joseph Joubert
  • Author: Joseph Joubert
  • ISBN: 9781590171486
  • Page: 325
  • Format: Paperback
  • The elusive French luminary Joseph Joubert is a great explorer of the mind s open spaces Edited and translated by Paul Auster, this selection from Joubert s notebooks introduces a master of the enigmatic who seeks to call everything by its true name while asking us to remember everything is double Joubert speaks in whispers, Auster writes One must draw very closeThe elusive French luminary Joseph Joubert is a great explorer of the mind s open spaces Edited and translated by Paul Auster, this selection from Joubert s notebooks introduces a master of the enigmatic who seeks to call everything by its true name while asking us to remember everything is double Joubert speaks in whispers, Auster writes One must draw very close to hear what he is saying.

    • Free Read [Humor and Comedy Book] ë The Notebooks of Joseph Joubert - by Joseph Joubert ✓
      325 Joseph Joubert
    • thumbnail Title: Free Read [Humor and Comedy Book] ë The Notebooks of Joseph Joubert - by Joseph Joubert ✓
      Posted by:Joseph Joubert
      Published :2019-09-09T12:27:24+00:00

    About "Joseph Joubert"

    1. Joseph Joubert

      Joseph Joubert was a French moralist and essayist, remembered today largely for his Pens es published posthumously.From the age of 14 Joubert attended a religious college in Toulouse, where he later taught until 1776 In 1778 he went to Paris where he met D Alembert and Diderot, amongst others, and later became friends with young writer and diplomat Chateaubriand.He alternated between living in Paris with his friends and life in the privacy of the countryside in Villeneuve sur Yonne He was appointed inspector general of the University under Napoleon.Joubert published nothing during his lifetime, but he wrote a copious amount of letters and filled sheets of paper and small notebooks with thoughts about the nature of human existence, literature and other topics, in a poignant, often aphoristic style After his death his widow entrusted Chateaubriand with these notes, and in 1838, he published a selection titled Recueil des pens es de M Joubert Collected Thoughts of Mr Joubert More complete editions were to follow, also of Joubert s correspondence.Somewhat of the Epicurean school of philosophy, Joubert enjoyed even his own suffering as he believed sickness gave subtlety to the soul.Joubert s works have been translated into numerous languages, into English by Paul Auster, amongst others.

    128 Comments

    1. Maurice Blanchot sums up this remarkable collection better than I ever could: “Joubert had his gift. He never wrote a book. He only prepared to write one, resolutely seeking the exact conditions that would allow him to write it. Then he forgot even this plan. More precisely, what he was seeking—this source of writing, this space in which to write, this light to circumscribe in space—demanded of him, affirmed in him inclinations that made him unfit for all ordinary literary work, or made hi [...]


    2. "truth. to surround it with figures and colors, so that it can be seen." this is exquisite and enchanting. a single page from these notebooks is more thought-provoking than the entirety of most novels being published today.


    3. A few quotes:Having found nothing worth more then emptiness he leaves space vacant.*Nothing corrects a badly made mind. A sad and irritating truth that we learn late and after so many wasted efforts!*Silence. - Joys of silence. - Thoughts must be born from the soul and words from silence. - An attentive silence.* burdened with the unbearable weight of ourself.*Beyond the brain, there is something that observes the brain itself.*To live without a body!*It is not mental repose they seek, but menta [...]


    4. For years I have been encountering aphorisms and comments by Joubert in books of quotations. Then I discovered this slim volume, which represents the full range of his published work, in Penn Books (one of the great book-shopping treasures of NYC, a small bookstore in Penn Station, in the LIRR concourse, that has a surprisingly robust selection of books, all the usual disposable commute and travel bestsellers but wonders like this.) “Are you listening to the ones who keep quiet?” ‘The hear [...]


    5. Read this in less than six hours and it was amazing. I felt like I was reading a book of wisdoms by a prophet or a founder of a religion, but it's even better because it isn't! And how tragic is it to think that Joubert never got to writing his great novel. His notebooks give a taste of what the world could have gained from his writing, and it's a bitter feeling knowing I'll never read what he had intended to write.Joubert's notebooks are full of love, illusion, and wisdom. A must read for anyon [...]


    6. Glorioso. Para aprendérselo de memoria, para vivir dentro de este librito recopilatorio de los apuntes vitales de este escritor que nunca publicó nada pero que sabía de todo y a todos influyó. Es irónico, inteligente. Son cientos de reflexiones sobre la vida, sobre escribir, pensamientos. Habla de sus ilustres amigos, de la sociedad que le rodea. es como un manual de filosofía.


    7. “Those for whom the world is not enough: saints, conquerors, poets, and all lovers of books” (126), or maybe some combination of the above, but let’s just assume it’s the last that’s brought us here. The Notebooks of Joseph Joubert is a selection of entries from Joseph Joubert’s journals, only published after his death. The translator, Paul Auster, sums up Joubert’s plight in a single sentence: “He was something far more oblique and challenging, a writer who spent his whole life [...]


    8. Even if half of Joubert's axiomatic ricocheting comes up short or even falls flat, those moments where he fixes beauty and knowledge together are wonderful, and they are unforgettable. Plus, it's important, I think, in a book of aphoristic nature, to be infuriated at least once every few pages; to be consistently disagreeing with the writer, troubling the writer's constructions. That's the point. [Except for the "where there is no God, nothing is sacred" stuff, which was a yawn, but, y'know, pro [...]


    9. "To survive one's passion and not one's strengths. Happy."I mean, it's epigrams, so some are better than others, but I really took to many of them. I'd be interested in reading a biography of the author, and may revisit Chateaubriand. Because these notebooks would be worth revisiting, I think I may break down and buy them (it?).


    10. I love the big book of French literature translated by Auster back in the early 80s or so, and this was previously included in another book with three translations by as many authors. Now on its own in this NYRB edition, these aphorisms and "deep thoughts" have a fascinating back story and can be read really fast. Perfect.


    11. "We must treat our lives as we treat our writings, put them in accord, give harmony to the middle, the end, and the beginning. In order to do this, we must make many erasures." -- 1798charming. some banalities but a short and good read.


    12. More reason to write down each day the thoughts great and little that pass through (but often over) our little heads.






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