Books

Eat Your Yard: Edible Trees, Shrubs, Vines, Herbs, and Flowers For Your Landscape

Eat Your Yard Edible Trees Shrubs Vines Herbs and Flowers For Your Landscape Eat Your Yard has information on edible plants that offer the best of both landscape and culinary uses Edible plants provide spring blossoms colorful fruit and flowers lush greenery fall foliage

  • Title: Eat Your Yard: Edible Trees, Shrubs, Vines, Herbs, and Flowers For Your Landscape
  • Author: Nan K. Chase
  • ISBN: 9781423603849
  • Page: 110
  • Format: Paperback
  • Eat Your Yard has information on 35 edible plants that offer the best of both landscape and culinary uses Edible plants provide spring blossoms, colorful fruit and flowers, lush greenery, fall foliage, and beautiful structure, but they also offer fruits, nuts, and seeds that you can eat, cook, and preserve.

    • ☆ Eat Your Yard: Edible Trees, Shrubs, Vines, Herbs, and Flowers For Your Landscape || ê PDF Download by ✓ Nan K. Chase
      110 Nan K. Chase
    • thumbnail Title: ☆ Eat Your Yard: Edible Trees, Shrubs, Vines, Herbs, and Flowers For Your Landscape || ê PDF Download by ✓ Nan K. Chase
      Posted by:Nan K. Chase
      Published :2019-07-07T18:16:03+00:00

    About "Nan K. Chase"

    1. Nan K. Chase

      Nan K. Chase Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Eat Your Yard: Edible Trees, Shrubs, Vines, Herbs, and Flowers For Your Landscape book, this is one of the most wanted Nan K. Chase author readers around the world.

    361 Comments

    1. Pretty photographs and clearly and concisely written prose do nothing to hide the fact that there's just nothing new here. It's the same old perennials, the same old fruit trees, the same shrubby plants that are in every garden book. Not what I was looking for. I wanted more of a Mother Earth News meets Foxfire meets Euell Gibbons sort of book, and I got Home & Garden meets Sunset instead.


    2. I'd hoped for good ideas on how to make a nice-looking edible landscape, but the book is mostly a list of different plants that might look nice in a landscape, plus some recipes. It's not a long list, either. Nothing particularly new or of interest here. Ended up skimming.


    3. Interesting little book. It provided a very cursory list of items to plant in your yard that are pretty as well as edible. None of the listings provide much, if any, growing or care info. Also, many items are really only growable in warmer climates, so if you are in California or Florida, you're in luck, Indiana, not so much. As I borrowed this book from the library I wasn't too disappointed, but if I had bought the book, I'd have felt a little cheated. Be that as it may, I did glean two or thre [...]


    4. This book describes landscape highlights (seasonal interest, good for hedges, etc), edible highlights, where it grows best (climate and situation), some cultivation tips, photos and recipes. I learned that pickled nasturtium seeds can be used as “poor mans capers," which is interesting since I'm hoping to add nasturtiums to our yard this year. There is not a lot of new information if you are well-versed in the world of edible landscaping, but the photos are inspirational. I wasn't too excited [...]


    5. An semi-interesting overview with nice pictures, but so unspecific as to be almost entirely unhelpful. Sections are like, "Apples. Apples are nice. Here's a story about apples. Some apples like well-draining soil. Some are short and some are tall" -- without even naming specific varieties -- "Do some research to find out which apple will grow best in your climate."Does get the creative juices flowing a bit, though.


    6. Book on how to landscape with perennial plants and fruit/nut trees. Certainly far more useful for a homeowner than for a tenant. Emphasis on both the utility and aesthetics of the plants in an edible landscape. Nice pictures, interesting little recipes, but nothing that I would find particularly useful as someone who relocates every few years.


    7. Didn't help me plan my yard at all (the plants that were suitable for our zone were all too common, and many were not suitable to the Pacific Northwest) which is what I was hoping for. Recipes are mostly common and boring.


    8. the best things about this book are the pictures and the recipes. an Easy read, didn't feel like I learned much, didn't really get any ideas to implement in my garden. I've thing I did learn was that rose hips are a great source of vitamin c. too bad I don't like the taste of roses


    9. This book is pretty much a list of types of edible food that you can grow in your garden with a little bit of information about each plant (hardiness zones, how to grow it, etc) and a recipe for each plant.


    10. Was hoping for something else when I saw this. This book has all the usual suspects in it, some recipes, but not much else. This is basically a book containing various types of fruit trees/plants, little else.



    11. I found out that I have several things in my yard that I didn't know were edible. For example: Yucca and Prickly Pear Cacti.


    12. Maybe not much new, but I loved it. The photography is gorgeous and inspiring. Best part is, the writer is from just over the mountain! So what works for her, should work for me.



    13. This book had a separate chapter for different edible trees, shrubs, vines etc. but a lot of those are not available where I live so I didn't find this book as helpful as I had hoped.



    14. nice book for novices to my the permaculture movement. really cool recipes though. worth a look. but i wouldn't run out and buy it for the library.


    15. Who knew that a dwarf pomegranate would act like a bush? I think we might get some for our yard. I highly recommend it as a starting point for ideas. I'm checking this one out again.


    16. This book was very helpful in allowing me to select specific trees for my backyard design with specific information regarding spacing, fruiting and sunlight requirements.


    Leave a Comment