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I Want To Live: The Diary of a Young Girl in Stalin's Russia

I Want To Live The Diary of a Young Girl in Stalin s Russia Recently unearthed in the archives of Stalin s secret police the NKVD Nina Lugovskaya s diary offers rare insight into the life of a teenage girl in Stalin s Russia when fear of arrest was a fact of

  • Title: I Want To Live: The Diary of a Young Girl in Stalin's Russia
  • Author: Nina Lugovskaya
  • ISBN: 9780618605750
  • Page: 250
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Recently unearthed in the archives of Stalin s secret police, the NKVD, Nina Lugovskaya s diary offers rare insight into the life of a teenage girl in Stalin s Russia when fear of arrest was a fact of daily life Like Anne Frank, thirteen year old Nina is conscious of the extraordinary dangers around her and her family, yet she is preoccupied by ordinary teenage concerns Recently unearthed in the archives of Stalin s secret police, the NKVD, Nina Lugovskaya s diary offers rare insight into the life of a teenage girl in Stalin s Russia when fear of arrest was a fact of daily life Like Anne Frank, thirteen year old Nina is conscious of the extraordinary dangers around her and her family, yet she is preoccupied by ordinary teenage concerns boys, parties, her appearance, who she wants to be when she grows up As Nina records her most personal emotions and observations, her reflections shape a diary that is as much a portrait of her intense inner world as it is the Soviet outer one.Preserved here, these markings the evidence used to convict Nina as a counterrevolutionary offer today s reader a fascinating perspective on the era in which she lived.

    • ☆ I Want To Live: The Diary of a Young Girl in Stalin's Russia || ↠ PDF Read by ✓ Nina Lugovskaya
      250 Nina Lugovskaya
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      Posted by:Nina Lugovskaya
      Published :2019-08-19T09:39:41+00:00

    About "Nina Lugovskaya"

    1. Nina Lugovskaya

      Nina Lugovskaya Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the I Want To Live: The Diary of a Young Girl in Stalin's Russia book, this is one of the most wanted Nina Lugovskaya author readers around the world.

    254 Comments

    1. The diary of a sensitive, intelligent and moody young girl against the backdrop of the purges and and politicide of Stalinist Russia.This book like The Diary of Anne Frank and the Diary of Eva Heyman (both child victims of the Nazi Holocaust) tells of the life through the eyes innocent young girl at a time of totalitarian terror and mass murder.Nina mainly talks of boys, her friends, her moods, her family and her own angst.But given the fact that her father had been a Social Revolutionary ( a pa [...]


    2. Here is a book that’s meant to: inspire comparisons with Anne Frank (according to the blurb). Frankly, the book disappointed me. Should there be any comparisons to be made, it would be that both girls kept diaries many years ago and/or during difficult years. Nina is the third daughter of a father who ends up being arrested for anti-Bolshevik activities. Her sisters are twins and her mother works hard to get any food on the table. Nina herself never really mentions the poverty they were livin [...]


    3. This girl, Nina, was advertised as "the Russian Anne Frank". However, having read the latter's diary, I can say that Nina, while a good writer, is not as good as Anne, nor is her diary as interesting as Anne's. Granted, Nina and her sisters and mother were imprisoned in Siberia, at which time the diary was confiscated. But Nina and her family survived, and lived on, whereas Anne did not. Aside from the comparisons, Nina's diary covers a period between 1932 and January 1937, in the early years of [...]


    4. Dubbed as the Russian Anne Frank on the cover of I Want to Live: The Diary of a Young Girl In Stalin’s Russia, Nina Lugovskaya tells her tale of growing up in turbulent times in Russia, in diary format.When I saw this book in the library, I knew it would be an interesting read. I had read The Diary of Anne Frank a few times in the past and have always come back to it because I admired Frank’s courage and hope. I only assumed that this book from a Russian perspective would be the same.While N [...]


    5. I could not finish it because there wasnt a real plot to it and I decided to find something more interesting to read


    6. This is an incredible book, authored by a teenager who was such a good writer that she outsmarted most of the reviewers here on . Congratulations to Andrew Bromfield for a terrific translation. I have read both Anne Frank and Nina Lugovskaya, and Nina's literary sophistication and beautiful prose can easily keep up with Anne's; as can the drama and tragedy of her life.


    7. I read till I could read no longer. I wondered why I experiencing feelings of deep depression. It was coinciding with the reading of the book. Touted as being akin to Anne Frank's amazing diary, just so you knowis is nothing like it. Yes it is the actual diary of a young girl. I think the comparison ends there. Nina, the writer of this diary, lives in Soviet Russia and gives you some idea of Russia under Stalin's iron fist. However, peppered throughout this book is Nina's desire to die. The self [...]


    8. Though along the same realm of Anne Frank's diary, Nina Lugobskaya's diary is vastly difference. While Anne's diary is hopeful and beautifully written, Nina's diary is more cynical and contains her day-to-day life. Of course, Anne was stuck in the Annex while Nina could go out and about, so we learn more about Stalin's Russia in her diary than we do Hitler's regime in Anne's. Anne and Nina are very different girls. Anne Frank was pretty, charming, the type of girl everyone liked, especially boys [...]


    9. From the back cover: This diary was unearthed decades after it was confiscated by the NKVD (?) in 1937. Nina wrote about all the dangers around her at the same time she wrote about all the things that adolescent girls worry about. The diary ends two days before the family’s apartment was thoroughly searched. Her diary was seized and carefully studied, the incriminating passages are uderlined thoughout the book. The diaries were used to convict her of being a “counterrevolutionary” who was [...]


    10. Oh, man. I had high hopes for this, since I'm reading it somewhat on the tails of all the other "wartime diaries" I've read--accounts of the Holocaust, Zlata's Diary, etc. But thisading it seems jumbled. At times, the language is so beautiful and poetic, you wonder if someone between the ages of 13-18 could actually have written it. And then for pages on end she goes into an emo rant about how much she hates herself, other people, and life in general, that you think, "Yeah. A teenager wrote this [...]


    11. synopsis: the plot of this book was to tell about the life of a young girl in stalin's russia. It is a diary of the girl Nina. Some of the most important thigs that happened were that people she knew were killed and she and her family were arrested. The book is mainly about Nina's life and the events that happen during her life during this terrible time in Russiaassification: This book was nonfiction (journal or diary)A) Audience was 14 and olderB) Why? because they wanted us to know what it was [...]


    12. I got this book for Christmas and read it after I had finished Anne Applebaum's 'Gulag: A History', which I thought worked out well because I knew about the history and facts of what actually occurred. I've always preferred, however, to read personal accounts of things like this. I just think a personal glimpse is so much more honest and real. As you can probably imagine, Nina being a 13 year old girl, the diary is filled with a lot of ramblings of boys at school and dreams for the future, but I [...]


    13. I believe that this book was accurate to how a young teenager to young adult with severe depression would approach life. Nina describes everyday life a lot, her goals for the future (that are rarely completed), crushes on boys, political beliefs, and dreams. I related to the book in the sense that I am very goal oriented as Nina is (probably why I'm giving the book 3 stars). However, while the book shows how teenage girls think it does not give us the greatest idea of what life was back during S [...]


    14. Gave up after 67 pages. It started off okay-ish and I did find it interesting enough to keep reading but the "story" never went anywhere. It was the same thing over and over again and the writing wasn't exciting enough to keep you wanting to read about nothing. I very much doubt I will finish it at some point considering the fact that it was so incredibly boring and repetitive. If I ever get to hear about that flaming Lev again I think I'll have to punch someone in the face!!


    15. This diary reads like a manic depressive with bipolar mood swings. In other words - a teenage girl. The diary itself is pretty unspectacular. The most interesting were the parts that were underlined by the NKVD and were deemed "counter-revolutionary." Some of the passages talked about her hatred of Stalin and the Bolsheviks, but other passages seemed pretty inane and I'm wondering what the Soviets found so offensive. An interesting read, but honestly quite boring.


    16. I really wanted to like this and hoped it would be reminiscent of Anne Frank's diary, but it fell short of my expectations. Nina's story is an intriguing one and maybe if she had the chance she would have "edited" her diary the way Anne did. I think the biggest obstacle was that Nina lacked Anne's optimism. I guess there was only one Anne Frank.


    17. I loved this book. It took me a little while to get into, but I found it really interesting. I don't like how some people say that it isn't interesting, or that she talks to much about boys, this was her diary. She wasnt expecting people to read it! I found it well written, and poetic in parts :) I could really feel for her while I was reading :)


    18. I was mesmerized by this book, but Nina was so annoying! The book's title is "I Want To Live" but most of the entries are about school, watching some boy, or wanting to commit suicide. She wanted to excel and do something great, but she never got off her butt to do anything! (But it was interesting to see what the police thought was treasonous.)


    19. I couldn't finish this book, while the beginning was interesting and the footnotes helpfulmething just felt off about this book. I may try it again later but I would not compare this to the Diary of Anne Frank as the book jacket does. But it is a very interesting slice of Russian life in the 1930's and 40's so read with some reservation.


    20. I thought that this book was really interesting and it really showed me how a young girl with severe depression approached life. I think that people who enjoy the diary of Anne Frank would enjoy this book.


    21. Tried, tried to no avail! Again this book hit the tedious nonsensical-my-mind-wondered and bad songs started playing in my head. Perhaps you know what I mean. So, I plan to try another Gulag-esque bookWe shall see! Oh, and I just started another Liza Markland--LOVE HER!--"Bomber" - TBD.


    22. I found this very refreshing to read after "The Bone Clocks." Very interesting to read how life has changed for young teenage girls through time and circumstance.



    23. the author is pretty snobby and insufferable. the way she looks down on people *IS* counter-revolutionary




    24. This is a personal diary, not a book. So search for the glimmers of insight buried like diamonds among the more mundane.




    25. If you're like me and got the book to learn about gulags, don't. It's a good book about everyday lifein Stalin's Russia, but only the last 2 pages dealnwith her imprisonment.


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