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REST in Practice: Hypermedia and Systems Architecture

REST in Practice Hypermedia and Systems Architecture Why don t typical enterprise projects go as smoothly as projects you develop for the Web Does the REST architectural style really present a viable alternative for building distributed systems and ente

  • Title: REST in Practice: Hypermedia and Systems Architecture
  • Author: Jim Webber Savas Parastatidis Ian Robinson
  • ISBN: 9780596805821
  • Page: 183
  • Format: Paperback
  • Why don t typical enterprise projects go as smoothly as projects you develop for the Web Does the REST architectural style really present a viable alternative for building distributed systems and enterprise class applications In this insightful book, three SOA experts provide a down to earth explanation of REST and demonstrate how you can develop simple and elegant distriWhy don t typical enterprise projects go as smoothly as projects you develop for the Web Does the REST architectural style really present a viable alternative for building distributed systems and enterprise class applications In this insightful book, three SOA experts provide a down to earth explanation of REST and demonstrate how you can develop simple and elegant distributed hypermedia systems by applying the Web s guiding principles to common enterprise computing problems You ll learn techniques for implementing specific Web technologies and patterns to solve the needs of a typical company as it grows from modest beginnings to become a global enterprise.Learn basic Web techniques for application integrationUse HTTP and the Web s infrastructure to build scalable, fault tolerant enterprise applicationsDiscover the Create, Read, Update, Delete CRUD pattern for manipulating resourcesBuild RESTful services that use hypermedia to model state transitions and describe business protocolsLearn how to make Web based solutions secure and interoperableExtend integration patterns for event driven computing with the Atom Syndication Format and implement multi party interactions in AtomPubUnderstand how the Semantic Web will impact systems design

    • ✓ REST in Practice: Hypermedia and Systems Architecture || ☆ PDF Download by ✓ Jim Webber Savas Parastatidis Ian Robinson
      183 Jim Webber Savas Parastatidis Ian Robinson
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      Posted by:Jim Webber Savas Parastatidis Ian Robinson
      Published :2020-02-15T00:20:55+00:00

    About "Jim Webber Savas Parastatidis Ian Robinson"

    1. Jim Webber Savas Parastatidis Ian Robinson

      Jim Webber Savas Parastatidis Ian Robinson Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the REST in Practice: Hypermedia and Systems Architecture book, this is one of the most wanted Jim Webber Savas Parastatidis Ian Robinson author readers around the world.

    467 Comments

    1. This book was EXCELLENT! I loved learning how powerful the HTTP protocol is for APPLICATIONs and not just for data transport. Easy to read with examples and a great sample application, anyone that wants to design agile, powerful and open applications should be using REST and exploiting HTTP to the fullest, otherwise they will be creating needless headaches for themselves. A fantastic book!


    2. A very good book with perfect combination of design considerations and implementation details. Different aspects of REST design are gradually introduced and explained in connection with the Richardson maturity model. Examples are especially good and show some nifty ideas and pleasant code structure.The book was issued in 2010. All the design ideas are surely still apply. But it is nice to see the development of Web formats and protocols since that time, like evolution of RDF-related formats or c [...]


    3. A bit long winded, however a calm walkthrough of enterprise backend systems. If you're coming from a /J2EE space, this is a recommended read. I would also recommend this to aspiring systems architects.



    4. I've found this immensely useful for understanding the REST principles that underpin software written for web.The book starts by describing the levels of the Richardson Maturity Model, from tunnelling RPC calls over HTTP, to full hypermedia systems. There's quite a thorough description of the use of URIs, HTTP methods (GET, POST, PUT etc), media types, conditional requests (eg how to PUT a resource only if its ETag header indicates it has not been modified), and server response codes (far beyond [...]


    5. It's a good book about REST. But it's focused mostly on the XML. So about 50% of content doesn't apply to JSON services. And I believe that high-load services should use JSON or BSON instead of XML just because they are much smaller and faster.Also it repeats the mistake made by Richardson in formulating RMM. The mistake in the way Richardson formulated RMM was to imply that systems with a higher number were inherently better. A RESTful system can be equally as crappy as an unRESTful system. The [...]


    6. The core concepts, I thought, were sound. And I appreciated the fact that they gave some practical guidance on and Java development for both implementing and consuming applications over HTTP. But, I felt like by the middle of the book, it started to fall apart. I have a hard time believing that the future of app development is long polling atom feeds. And frankly, I didn't find their usage of atom pub particularly compelling. Their examples required a lot of squinting to agree that basing the d [...]


    7. More practical than the paper that originally coined the term REST and the section on level of maturity was nice to read. Although I might not agree with the hypermedia classification necessarily being the highest to go for. It feels rather complicated for many applications.Not all was well though. The book being a few years old now it was already showing its age in several sections, i.e. where it was describing Atom/AtomPub as the next best thing while it pretty much dismissed micro formats as [...]


    8. This 2010 book—already—dives into REST services. Following the example of the Restbucks coffee shop, it gradually touches upon various issues, such as scaling, caching, security, etc. The authors illustrate each concerns with both Java and code snippets and give a glimpse about possible implementations. They finally compare "traditional" WebServices (WS-*) with REST technology highlighting the pros and cons of both sides.I really discovered the idea of hypermedia services, REST is actually [...]


    9. If you want to know what the hell is REST go and read Architectural Styles and the Design of Network-based Software Architectures or Principled Design of the Modern Web Architecture by Roy Thomas Fielding, this book will help you after that. Although it's bloated with and Java examples, it has a lot information on how to build RESTful services and take advantage of new technologies, like OpenID, OAuth and AtomPub.


    10. I read this book in fits and starts, in part because I found it to dry to engage with for long spells. Since I have found most other explanations of RESTful development difficult to grasp, I have to commend this book for getting me further. Also, there is enough breadth of coverage of architectural issues that the book is a helpful reference point.I got an enourmous amount out of chapter 7 on ATOM. There is probably two reasons for this: I derived a similar solution in ATOM some time ago for a s [...]


    11. It's a good solid book that goes over the different kinds of REST in order, and explains why it is that HATEOAS and MIME types are really the most extensible form of REST that you can use.I would have appreciated more discussion of HATEOAS edge case such as batching and partial updates, and a more in-depth explanation of what a resource is and how to cut down on network round trips (this was a concern when writing an API that had to interact with a flash client, as starting a flash client and do [...]


    12. Everyone talks about REST, but only a few can explain it in a concise und understandable way as it’s done in this book. The different levels of hypermedia solutions and how their different behaviour will influence the real-world usage was an eye opener. There are many good ideas in the book to experiment with, but the ATOM feed to publish events is the one I find the most useful. The book is a must-read if you want to build software using REST as an architecture model.


    13. I took a very long break reading this because I was sick of web services of any kind. But I have finally finished reading it and am really impressed. If you have anything you want to share with anyone on the internet, this book has examples of how to do it and good explanations of the pros and cons. Very thorough. Maybe a bit dry with the .Net & Java code samples.


    14. great stuff, the introductory chapters, resonate with devs getting a grasp on REST. The restbucks example is a great use case for teaching various RESTful aspects of a believable system non-trivial.


    15. Excellent introduction to REST, including not only the what and the how, but a really strong case for the why. I highly recommend this if you do web services development, even if REST is not currently on your radar.


    16. Good reference on REST for a beginner like myself. Good pacing; gets right to the point with minimal fluff to detract from what is being taught.The book does not much address the why of REST but that helps the book be more focused and concise.


    17. A good book, though not particularly enjoyable to read. The material presented is good, but there's not tons of style or personality to keep you going through the 350 pages. Still, I learned a bunch and corrected some misconceptions I had about REST, so I would say it was worth my time.




    18. Good summary of REST. I missed an approach to evolving APIs, which seems inherently difficult using XML.


    19. Decent book. Good diagrams. A bit JAVA heavy, but you may be able to do analogous things in other languages. A good mix of high-level architecture and brass-tacks "how-to."


    20. Great book. Helped me to get my head around what all this REST stuff is. If you can only read one book on RESTful architectures, then this is probably the one.




    21. REST concepts are excellently explained. This book will teach you how to make to most out of REST architectural style




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