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Four Views on Divine Providence

Four Views on Divine Providence Questions about divine providence have preoccupied Christians for generations Are people elected to salvation For whom did Jesus die This book introduces readers to four prevailing views on divine pro

  • Title: Four Views on Divine Providence
  • Author: Dennis Jowers Gregory A. Boyd Ron Highfield Paul Kjoss Helseth Stanley N. Gundry
  • ISBN: 9780310325123
  • Page: 122
  • Format: Paperback
  • Questions about divine providence have preoccupied Christians for generations Are people elected to salvation For whom did Jesus die This book introduces readers to four prevailing views on divine providence, with particular attention to the question of who Jesus died to save the extent of the atonement and if or how God determines who will be saved predestination uestions about divine providence have preoccupied Christians for generations Are people elected to salvation For whom did Jesus die This book introduces readers to four prevailing views on divine providence, with particular attention to the question of who Jesus died to save the extent of the atonement and if or how God determines who will be saved predestination.But this book does not merely answer readers questions Four Views on Divine Providence helps readers think theologically about all the issues involved in exploring this doctrine The point counterpoint format reveals the assumptions and considerations that drive equally learned and sincere theologians to sharp disagreement It unearths the genuinely decisive issues beneath an often superficial debate Volume contributors are Paul Helseth God causes every creaturely event that occurs William Lane Craig through his middle knowledge, God controls the course of worldly affairs without predetermining any creatures free decisions Ron Highfield God controls creatures by liberating their decision making and Gregory Boyd human decisions can be free only if God neither determines nor knows what they will be Introductory and closing essays by Dennis Jowers give relevant background and guide readers toward their own informed beliefs about divine providence.

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    About "Dennis Jowers Gregory A. Boyd Ron Highfield Paul Kjoss Helseth Stanley N. Gundry"

    1. Dennis Jowers Gregory A. Boyd Ron Highfield Paul Kjoss Helseth Stanley N. Gundry

      Dennis Jowers Gregory A. Boyd Ron Highfield Paul Kjoss Helseth Stanley N. Gundry Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Four Views on Divine Providence book, this is one of the most wanted Dennis Jowers Gregory A. Boyd Ron Highfield Paul Kjoss Helseth Stanley N. Gundry author readers around the world.

    391 Comments

    1. This was a very enlightening read that helped confirm what I already suspected was true. Paul Kjoss Helseth depicted are grotesque picture of God as an omni-derigent all-causing control freak who is responsible for all human action yet then tried to claim human being still have moral responsibility. Ron Highfield was not much better, although he denied the sort of omni-causality that Helseth proposes. However, his solution to resolving divine foreknowledge and human free will was to resort to my [...]


    2. A difficult read for a counterpoint entry but worth working through if you can do it. However, I would recommend familiarizing yourself with the four views of Calvinism, Arminianism, Molinism and Open Theism before reading these four scholars interact (sometimes sharply) with each other.



    3. The Counterpoints format serves a topic like the one dealt with in this book very well indeed. Each of the four authors is given the opportunity to set forth and develop his view of Divine Providence, followed by short contributions by the other three authors after each main essay which offer responses to each view.Overall, the debate felt well balanced - Helseth, Craig, Highfield and Boyd are excellent scholars who handle their subject with care and precision. They are, on the whole, respectful [...]


    4. I like the book. However, I think the non-inclusion of a simple foreknowledge w/ free will (which is how I understand most Armenians, Catholics, Eastern Orthodox) was a substantial deficit. This is particularly true given the 2 nearly identical views that represented a more Calvinist understanding that were included.


    5. Two authors, Highfield and Helseth, present their view that God controls all things. Though their views differ slightly(?), neither suggests that God is evil. Both maintain that God wills all human sin. The problem of evil is resolved by denying the reality and permanence of evil. What seems to us to be evil now will, in the end, actually be seen as good. Craig presents his version of Molinism. The idea is that prior to creation God considered all of the possible and feasible worlds inhabited by [...]


    6. This is a great book that gives four potential theological stances in regards to divine providence. The four views presented are:"God Causes All Things" by Paul Kjoss Helseth"God Directs All Things" by William Lane Craig"God Controls By Liberating" by Ron Highfield"God Limits His Control" by Gregory A. BoydFor each viewpoint, an expert holding that belief describes all the reasons that he feels this is the best theological point of view. Then the other three theologians/scholars take time to res [...]


    7. Excellent overview of the issue along with strong interaction between the contributors. To echo something Dr. Craig said in a podcast, I wish that they would have had a contributor who defended something of a mystery view, something to the effect of "God is sovereign, man is free, and how these things work together is just a mystery we have to live with!" Such a contributor would have been a more helpful addition than Ron Highfield, who along with espousing almost the same view as Paul Helseth, [...]


    8. Excellent overview of the issue along with strong interaction between the contributors. To echo something Dr. Craig said in a podcast, I wish that they would have had a contributor who defended something of a mystery view, something to the effect of "God is sovereign, man is free, and how these things work together is just a mystery we have to live with!" Such a contributor would have been a more helpful addition than Ron Highfield, who along with espousing almost the same view as Paul Helseth, [...]


    9. Deeply philosophicalNot deeply enough Scriptural. This is not to say that the philosophies contained here-in are not important in their own right, but only that philosophy should be secondary to Scripture-icity where Christian theology is concerned. I did appreciate the depth of thought clearly undergone by the contributors as well as the occasional use of humor in some of the rebuttals. In the end, most readers (including myself) will probably either need to work through the material slowly in [...]


    10. Very good presentation and intro in to the constructs of Molinist and open theism. I tend towards the feeling that Boyd's and Craig's writings and responses are the most entertaining, fulfilling, challenging and provoking of the book. They happen to represent open theism. The other two are much less so, which might be a downfall for a book that is supposed to represent dialogue between the two sides. I found Helseth's critiques even less intriguing than his actual presentation, even as his prese [...]


    11. This was a very interesting book because it the four views of divine providence range from the solid biblical viewpoint to the outlandish and contradictory concepts of open theism. Each author states his case then the other three present a response. It was instructive to see what the proponents of the absurd had to say for themselves in contrast with the critical responses from the opposition. You must be able to analyze as you read to get the most out of this book or you will end up agreeing wi [...]


    12. Excellent dialogue. Worth the read. Helseth's critique of Boyd's essay is actually better than his essay arguing in favor of his position, and also Craig's essay is really well articulated as well. Great stuff in here. Albeit I hold to a deterministic scheme a la the Reformed confessions, this discussion was both encouraging and fruitful, and helped me honestly understand both Molinism and Open theism better than I had hitherto.


    13. I have about had it now with the point and counter point series that said this one had some great pastoral insights for all my disagreements with Boyd I found some of his pastoral concerns actually worthy of considering Again, I do NOT agree with his solutions but as to the questions that need to be answered (given how this whole topic has played out in the abstract and ethereal) I think we need to at least listen to what he is saying.


    14. The difference between the two Calvinist viewpoints is minimal, making this more like a 3.33 views book. However, all 4 of the contributions are worth reading, and the responses add much to the discussion. I would have liked to have seen a response to the responses, but not an infinite regress (!).2 Calvinists, and Open Theist and a Molinist.


    15. Excellent intro to Molinism and Open Theism by two of those views' ablest defenders (Craig and Boyd). Their responses to one another are excellent as well. Suffers, however, from the other two essays, one of which is almost worthless. The two mentioned, however, are good enough on their own to earn 4 stars.


    16. The four contributors do a good job of explaining their positions, but in the end very little is accomplished in their interactions. This is a good survey of 4 positions on the providence of God and the free will of man, but one will need to study much further if they seeking information to help form their own understanding.


    17. This book's main mistake was the inclusion of 2 Calvinist views on the topic - one would have been fine.It's surprising that they didn't include an Arminian account of providence. Boyd's account of Open Theism (which I reject), was helpful in understanding what that view believes.


    18. I had alot of fun reading this. The Reformed guy (Helseth) knew the Scriptures the best, it seemed apparent, though Haywood was very versed as well. Craig is smart, but Scripturally he gets bludgeoned by Helseth.


    19. Good debate between 2-3 positions. Unfortunately, the fourth view is so similar to the other reformed view that it seemed to take up room where another view could have taken its place.





    20. A great book for quick insight into the deeper issues of the faith. Great for getting quick insight into the main views on divine providence but hard in making a personal clear cut decision :)


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