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The Latin-Centered Curriculum: A Homeschooler's Guide to a Classical Education

The Latin Centered Curriculum A Homeschooler s Guide to a Classical Education Andrew Campbell s new book The Latin Centered Curriculum gives teachers and parents an interesting and easy to read guide explaining classical education how it came about and who its major exponen

  • Title: The Latin-Centered Curriculum: A Homeschooler's Guide to a Classical Education
  • Author: Andrew A.Campbell
  • ISBN: 9781930953710
  • Page: 444
  • Format: Paperback
  • Andrew Campbell s new book, The Latin Centered Curriculum, gives teachers and parents an interesting and easy to read guide explaining classical education, how it came about, and who its major exponents are In addition to a useful scope and sequence for how a Latin centered classical education can be accomplished in a home or private school, Campbell explains why the centAndrew Campbell s new book, The Latin Centered Curriculum, gives teachers and parents an interesting and easy to read guide explaining classical education, how it came about, and who its major exponents are In addition to a useful scope and sequence for how a Latin centered classical education can be accomplished in a home or private school, Campbell explains why the central principle behind classical education is the study of Latin and Greek.Campbell provides a short history of the modern classical movement, examines the predominant role of Latin in a classical education, and explains how the other pieces of the classical curriculum fit together He provides the practical application to Tracy Lee Simmons statement that a Classical education is a curriculum grounded upon Greek, Latin, and the study of civilization from which the arose In addition to chapters on Latin, Greek, and logic, Campbell covers the various content areas of classical education, such as English studies, classical studies, Christian and modern studies, with sections on arithmetic, science, and mathematics.But this is far from a purely theoretical book In a chapter entitled, Scope and Sequence, he gives a practical overview of what a Latin based classical curriculum looks like from Kindergarten to 12th grade With helpful charts and explanations, this book constitutes a manual for the Christian educator who wants a complete understanding of what is involved in a classical education.The most important section in the book, may well be the chapter titled Multum non Multa This is the principle sometimes expressed by the maxim, Less is It is the idea that, rather than throwing multiple subjects at students and burying them under a mountain of unconnected disciplines, educators should instead employ an integrated focus on a few important core disciplines and related subject areas.The best education, Campbell points out, is simple but deep.

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      Published :2019-07-01T15:32:28+00:00

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    940 Comments

    1. I re-read this book every year. It's short, and helps me to remember that education is "lighting a fire, not filling a bucket" (can't remember who said that, but it's true).This book focuses on simplicity - both in the curriculum/book choices and the schedule. I prefer the first edition, as it relies more on living books. I love how the author includes music in the daily schedule, and the 1 hour of family reading, plus 30-60 minutes of silent reading for each child. But the best part of the book [...]


    2. I read the first edition. Campbell's argument effectively fleshed out why I would NOT follow this pedagogy. I've been long convinced of the value of studying the Latin and Greek roots of English and the merits of being familiar with the great philosophers and the Greco-Roman contribution to Western Culture. But I cannot venerate it to the exclusion of of math and science, nonwestern culture, and modern classic literature. Latin can stretch the mind, but so does math and physics. I appreciate the [...]


    3. Education is one of my main interests, and over time I’ve read a vast number of books and articles about various philosophies and methods of education and developed my own sense of how I’d like to pursue it in my family. Because I tend to be a strategic/big picture sort of person, I have a vision for how the parts of various philosophies and methods can work together into a great education for my kids, but I have long struggled with how to begin. If I want my child taking Latin AP exams in h [...]


    4. I really enjoyed this bookI've been reading and rereading it over the last 2 months! Its given me fresh inspiration for a classical educationd I have started to implement some of its suggestions in our curriculum. If there is one area that I can't get on board with, its in the area of science. I can't get behind the notion of focusing mainly on nature studies for science until Grade 9! In this day and environment, I truly believe that a lack of STEM focused studies would be a great disservice. W [...]


    5. This book was exactly what I needed. Basically just a year-by-year, blow-for-blow account of a Latin and Greek centered classical homeschooling experience.Awesome. I could do without the bible studies, but I expect that shit from homeschoolers, so I forgive them.


    6. I'm impressed by this second edition of The Latin-Centered Curriculum. In this book, Andrew Campbell has provided a good introduction to the classical education model and proposed a well-detailed curriculum. It's thoroughness and level of detail is comparable to Laura Berquist's The Well Trained Mind, without following the "neoclassical" stages-of-learning model. Instead, Campbell is doggedly faithful to the principle of "not many but much" (or quality over quantity), encouraging many informal e [...]


    7. Campbell has written a how-to guide for those who aspire to the lofty educational vision of Climbing Parnassus. I really wanted to love this book, and in fact I did love this book. It presents an excellent and ambitious curriculum plan focusing heavily on ancient Greece and Rome (one year for each). I am just not quite sold on the "multum non multa" idea of focusing on a few key areas and going deeply into them. I don't feel like you have to give up "wide" for "deep." I've incorporated some aspe [...]


    8. Own. This one goes into my "favorite" category for education books. Its motto is multum non multa: not quantity, but quality. He explains his philosophy with brevity and clarity, then outlines materials and schedules with grace and flexibility. His premise is that we should study a few great things deeply, rather than study many things. His curriculum section then explains his pared-down approach. Yes, Latin and classical studies are his unifying force, and he actually does what Dorothy Sayers s [...]


    9. Andrew Campbell's second edition is now available, and it is FABULOUS. Not to be missed by any LCC home educators. He has completely reworked the schedules and some curricular recommendations (though the scope and sequence is essentially the same), but really, the first few chapters are reason enough to buy the book. Campbell lays out the principles of a LCC, the history behind LCC, and the holistic benefits of the approach. I especially appreciated the beefed up section on great Christians of o [...]


    10. The Well-Trained Mind was a good start towards a neo-classical education; this book puts it all into perspective and explains how to practically implement a *genuine* classical education. If I could start homeschooling all over again, I would use this book as my guide. I have used some of the curricula recommendations and can heartily endorse them.


    11. He didn't *quite* convince me that my children should be able to read the classics in the original languages, but maybe Climbing Parnassus will better do that. This book did make me think about doing less in our homeschool, but going deeper, and it definitely made me re-think my priorities as a homeschooler and how we might do things differently this coming year.


    12. If you are looking for a book to help design a Latin-centered curriculum, this could be a helpful addition to your bookshelf. I think I was expecting it to be more of an argument for or justification of the study of Latin, so it really wasn't what I was looking for.


    13. This book presents one view of a traditional classical education. The proposed selections and underlying philosphy ("multum non multa") have de-stressed (somewhat!) my own approach to classical home education. I also appreciate the many religious/Christian selections.


    14. I've read so many books on homeschooling in search of the perfect way to make the most amazing kids :) but have found there really isn't one way. This one is a good start, and definitely makes you think outside the box of modern education.



    15. Excellent! Echos many of the thoughts in Climbing Parnassus, but more accessible to the average reader. I highly recommend this one!



    16. This was generously sent ot me from the good folks at Memoria Press, a ggod one to have on your shelf!



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