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Paradise Restored: A Biblical Theology of Dominion

Paradise Restored A Biblical Theology of Dominion Does the Bible teach Christians to expect victory or defeat in this world In this powerful book David Chilton sets forth extensive biblical evidence for the historic Christian view know as postmillen

  • Title: Paradise Restored: A Biblical Theology of Dominion
  • Author: David H. Chilton
  • ISBN: 9780915815654
  • Page: 176
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Does the Bible teach Christians to expect victory or defeat in this world In this powerful book, David Chilton sets forth extensive biblical evidence for the historic Christian view know as postmillennialism the teaching that, before the Second Coming of Christ, the world will be successfully evangelized and discipled to Christianity The author emphasized that our viewDoes the Bible teach Christians to expect victory or defeat in this world In this powerful book, David Chilton sets forth extensive biblical evidence for the historic Christian view know as postmillennialism the teaching that, before the Second Coming of Christ, the world will be successfully evangelized and discipled to Christianity The author emphasized that our view of the future is inescapably bound up with our view of Jesus Christ The fact that Jesus is now King of kings and Lord of lords means that His Gospel must be victorious The Holy Spirit will bring the water of life to the ends of the earth The Christian message is one of Hope Pentecost was just the beginning.

    • [PDF] Download ☆ Paradise Restored: A Biblical Theology of Dominion | by ✓ David H. Chilton
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      Posted by:David H. Chilton
      Published :2020-04-25T04:44:12+00:00

    About "David H. Chilton"

    1. David H. Chilton

      David Harold Chilton 1951 1997 was a Reformed pastor, Christian Reconstructionist, speaker, and author of several books on economics, eschatology and Christian Worldview from Placerville, California He contributed three books on eschatology Paradise Restored 1985 , The Days of Vengeance 1987 , and The Great Tribulation 1987.His book Productive Christians in an Age of Guilt Manipulators A Biblical Response to Ronald J Sider 1981 was a response to Ronald J Sider s best selling book, Rich Christians in an Age of Hunger A Biblical Study 1977 , which promoted various programs of wealth redistribution by the government Chilton argued that the Bible either does not authorize such programs or explicitly teaches against them.His book Power in the Blood A Christian Response to AIDS 1987 was primarily dealing with the Church s relationship with the world.David Chilton was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1951 At the age of one, he moved with his Christian missionary parents to the Philippines At the age of 8, the family returned to the United States where his father became a pastor in Southern California Growing up in California in the 1970s youth movement and hippie culture, he experienced a conversion to Christianity while listening to a missionary speak at his father s church He began reading the Bible and teaching Bible studies The young Chilton consequently became deeply involved in the nascent Jesus People movement, and started a singing group with his sister Jayn and some friends called The Children of Light He frequently spoke, performed music, and taught Bible studies at Christian coffeehouses in Los Angeles, California region He was ordained in the Jesus People Movement by Pat Boone.Chilton came to prominence as a writer for the Chalcedon Report edited by R.J Rushdoony after a Christian friend recommended one of Rushdoony s books At the same time, Chilton discovered the writings of the Puritans, and was exposed for the first time to Reformed theology as a result of reading these books, and to the doctrines of predestination, election, and perseverance of the saints After meeting Rushdoony, Chilton was asked to write a monthly column for Chalcedon Report while alternating speaking for Dr Rushdoony at his church in Hollywood which was affiliated with the Orthodox Presbyterian Church while pastoring a church in Anaheim, California At this time Chilton was also influenced by fellow Christian Reconstructionists Greg Bahnsen and James B Jordan He married his wife, Darlene, and had 3 children, Nathan, Jacob, and Abigail.In 1981, after several years of pastoring in Anaheim, Chilton wrote his first book, Productive Christians in an Age of Guilt Manipulators A Biblical Response to Ronald J Sider over the course of a month with a pencil and paper at a coffeehouse Not long after the completion of the book, he moved to Placerville, CA to pastor a church for a year, during which he wrote a newsletter for Christian teachers and homeschoolers called The Biblical Educator Chilton also used his influence to help launch World Magazine with Joel Belz and wrote a monthly column for the publication for years, which was very popular.Although Chilton loved the people of Placerville and did not want to leave, he accepted a job offer from prominent Reconstructionist and Rushdoony son in law Gary North as a research assistant at The Institute for Christian Economics in Tyler, Texas It was during his three year stay in Texas that North commissioned Chilton to write his two books for North s imprint Dominion Press Paradise Restored and Days of Vengeance.In 1986 Chilton accepted an offer to return to Placerville to pastor the church there He continued to work in pastoral ministry, speak at conferences, write a weekly column for The Sacramento Union newspaper, was counsel for The Fieldstead Co at an economic conference in Switzerland and wro

    952 Comments

    1. This is one of those books that is totally convincing--not due to the persuasiveness of the author and his arguments, but because part of you is already persuaded and just needed to make the paradigm shift in your thinking and reject the predominant beliefs.I don't mean to discredit Chilton. He is a good, engaging writer. He does use persuasive arguments, but I think he would affirm that the Bible is very clear in teaching dominion and postmillenial eschatology. Most Christians just need to hear [...]


    2. This was the first theological work I ever read. I was 12 years old and had already absorbed a premillenial eschatology from the Christian culture surrounding me. This book exploded that pessimistic vision of the future, and built in its place a deep gladness and hope. What I learned in this book continues to be one of my most precious possessions: as anyone can tell you who has even had a flirtation with postmillenialism, it's a deeply attractive doctrine.Granted, one is easily convinced at 12, [...]


    3. David Chilton is a very good writer. This is his third book I've read and he never disappoints. He is a humorous author but has his theology aright! In this work he tries to bring out the entire teaching of the Bible on the topic of "Dominion". He starts the book in the garden, highlights many things unseen to most interpreters and proceeds forward the writing about the kingdom and what that means. Outside of Chilton's "interpretive maximalism" which is, in short, deriving the maximum meaning an [...]


    4. Buy it, read it, read it again and again and then buy it for every Christian you know!!! Seriously a great book and an easy read too! The Preface stated that it was not too often you would read a Theological Treatise and consider it a "page turner" but stated this book was and RIGHT they were!!! If you have ever wondered about what mankind lost in its rebellion to God in the Garden of Eden and wondered how God is working through that and all through history, then this is your book! It delves int [...]


    5. I thought this was a great book. Chilton starts with a description of Eden and goes on to show how it's theme runs throughout the whole of the Bible. This book really opened up my eyes to allot of things in the Bible I use to just read over and thought had no significance. He ends this book with a defense for the millennial view known as Postmillennialism. He shows the reader from Scripture that Christ's kingdom is not a politcal future kingdom but is here now and that his kingdom will continue [...]



    6. I have a new pet peeve: the use of "obviously" in argument. If your premises lead obviously to your conclusion, you have no need to point out your own obviousness. To do so insults your reader. Chilton uses "obviously" with tedious frequency. I had expected an academic or theological work with a side of snark. Chilton reverses the formula and majors on snark and belittling rather than research, or Bible for that matter. How do I make persuasive case for postmillennialism to my conscientious pre- [...]


    7. This was one of my dad's favorites and now it's one of mine too. What a hopeful, optimistic, exciting, and biblical look at the future of the world! Spurgeon, quoted in the book, says it so well, “I myself believe that King Jesus will reign, and the idols be utterly abolished; but I expect the same power which turned the world upside down once will still continue to do it. The Holy Ghost would never suffer the imputation to rest upon His holy name that He was not able to convert the world.”


    8. Very good introduction to Post-Millennial eschatology. Highlights the importance of using the Bible to interpret the Bible. A bit reactionary at times being written in the heyday of Hal Lindsey & the other Dispensational Premillennialists but as much is to be expected.I recommend this book to anyone interested in a solid approach to the Biblical narrative, particularly as it pertains to the interpretive principles of Biblical prophecy and Biblical eschatology.



    9. Over the past two decades I have purchased about 20 copies of this book and given them to friends. This book was a watershed in my life that delivered me from the bondage of pessimilennialism.





    10. I certainly don't agree with everything that David Chilton held to, especially with regards to his reconstructionist and liturgical high-church worldviews (I had the honor of knowing David personally before he died, having had many interesting discussions on these topics). However I think that this commentary on Revelation is very thought-provoking and generally well-written. I especially like his emphasis on Paradise-restored, or "back to Genesis." Note the following summation, "The Paradise Th [...]


    11. This might be one of the worst books I admit to reading. The error, or should I say outright purposeful misquoting, of Eusebius is unforgivable because it is so easily verified by looking it up in his Ecclesiastical History. When a historical quote destroys the basis of your post millennial eschatology, maybe its time to question your belief, instead of trashing history. "at the close of Domitian's reign" is anything but unclear. 90-95 AD is not prior to 70 AD. Anything else said in this book is [...]


    12. This is the best introduction to eschatology and Revelation I have ever read. David Chilton begins by examining the symbols built in the world at creation and then surveys how these symbols are used throughout the old testament. He then moves to Revelation assuming that those symbols will be understood by first century Christians in light of the scriptures and symbols they were familiar with.


    13. I grew up in the church, but was unfamiliar with postmillenial dominion eschatology. The ideas chilton laid out in his book are for the reader to judge, but I will say that he seems to back up himself up with a decent amount of biblical evidence and references.A nice addition to your theology library and a wonderful introduction into this sometimes misunderstood and avoided subject.


    14. More than any other book, Paradise Restored revolutionized how I read the Bible. Not as intricate as Jordan's or Leithart's symbology but was a great introduction to the topic. Chilton opened a new world to me as a fairly young and avid Christian.


    15. Read it, re-read it. Not only educational, but blessed my socks off! I am thankful to have come across this gem.



    16. Outstanding! There are several good books out there defending Postmillennial eschatology. This one's my favorite, so far. (Second time reading this in a year.)




    17. Excellent. However I can begin to see Chilton's over emphasis of the Church as an institution and a heavy influence of Jordan's typology.


    18. This was an eye-opening book to me, and I found a lot of it compelling. Though at times the author seemed to act like dispensationalists are idiots, and I dislike that sort of rhetoric.





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